Factors associated with smoking cessation and smoking cessation interventions in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries

Sarah S. Monshi, Michael Halpern

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examined published literature describing the predictors of smoking cessation (SC) and cessation interventions in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. Methods: Systematic literature review using PubMed, Google Scholar, and grey literature. The study was conducted between October and December of 2017. Inclusion criteria were studies reporting factors associated with SC or studies of utilization or delivery of SC medications in GCC countries. Results: Twenty-one articles met the study criteria. Thematic analysis revealed factors associated with SC that were classified as individual or clinician level. Individual-level factors were access and cost of SC medications, knowledge about harms, concern about health, self-efficacy, perceived stress, level of tobacco consumption, belief about SC medications, clinician advice, social support, and enforcement of smokefree ban. Clinician-level factors were time to provide counseling, training to assist patients, patient acceptance, best practice for treating patients, resources, perception related to responsibilities, and knowledge about effective medications. Conclusion: This review revealed perceived barriers to SC among smokers and clinicians in GCC countries. It highlighted cultural factors that need to be addressed by tobacco use policies in GCC countries to help smokers quit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-125
Number of pages7
JournalSaudi Medical Journal
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Smoking Cessation
Tobacco Use
Literature
Self Efficacy
Practice Guidelines
PubMed
Social Support
Statistical Factor Analysis
Counseling
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Factors associated with smoking cessation and smoking cessation interventions in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries. / Monshi, Sarah S.; Halpern, Michael.

In: Saudi Medical Journal, Vol. 40, No. 2, 01.02.2019, p. 119-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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abstract = "Objectives: To examined published literature describing the predictors of smoking cessation (SC) and cessation interventions in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. Methods: Systematic literature review using PubMed, Google Scholar, and grey literature. The study was conducted between October and December of 2017. Inclusion criteria were studies reporting factors associated with SC or studies of utilization or delivery of SC medications in GCC countries. Results: Twenty-one articles met the study criteria. Thematic analysis revealed factors associated with SC that were classified as individual or clinician level. Individual-level factors were access and cost of SC medications, knowledge about harms, concern about health, self-efficacy, perceived stress, level of tobacco consumption, belief about SC medications, clinician advice, social support, and enforcement of smokefree ban. Clinician-level factors were time to provide counseling, training to assist patients, patient acceptance, best practice for treating patients, resources, perception related to responsibilities, and knowledge about effective medications. Conclusion: This review revealed perceived barriers to SC among smokers and clinicians in GCC countries. It highlighted cultural factors that need to be addressed by tobacco use policies in GCC countries to help smokers quit.",
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