Factors Associated with the Acceptability of Male Circumcision among Men in Jamaica

Melonie M. Walcott, Pauline E. Jolly, John E Ehiri, Ellen Funkhouser, Mirjam C. Kempf, Deborah Hickman, Maung Aung, Kui Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives:To determine the prevalence of male circumcision (MC) among men in the western region of Jamaica, and to identify factors associated with acceptability of MC for self, infants (<1 year) and older sons (1-17 years).Methods:A cross-sectional, interviewer-administered questionnaire survey of 549 men aged 19-54 years was conducted in the western region of Jamaica. The survey included questions about the acceptance of MC for self, infants, and sons before and after an information session about the benefits of MC in preventing HIV/STI transmission. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors that were associated with acceptability of MC. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated from the models.Results:Fourteen percent of the men reported that they were circumcised. In the multivariable model, which adjusted for age, education, religion and income, there were increased odds of accepting MC for infants/sons among uncircumcised men who accepted MC for self (AOR=8.1; 95% CI = 4.1-15.9), believed they would experience more pleasure during sex if circumcised (AOR=4.0; 95% CI = 2.0-8.2), and reported having no concerns regarding MC (AOR=3.0; 95% CI = 1.8-4.8). Similarly, uncircumcised men who reported no concerns about MC or who believed that they would experience more pleasure during sex if circumcised were more likely to accept MC for self.Conclusion:Providing men with information about MC increased acceptance of MC for self, infants (<17 years) and sons (1-17 years). Since targeted education on the benefits of male circumcision for prevention of HIV/STI can be effective in increasing acceptability of MC, health professionals should be trained, and willing to discuss MC with men in healthcare facilities and in the community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere75074
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 16 2013

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Jamaica
Male Circumcision
Education
Logistics
Nuclear Family
odds ratio
Health
confidence interval
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Pleasure
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
education
Logistic Models
HIV
religion
gender
Religion
health care workers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Walcott, M. M., Jolly, P. E., Ehiri, J. E., Funkhouser, E., Kempf, M. C., Hickman, D., ... Zhang, K. (2013). Factors Associated with the Acceptability of Male Circumcision among Men in Jamaica. PLoS One, 8(9), [e75074]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0075074

Factors Associated with the Acceptability of Male Circumcision among Men in Jamaica. / Walcott, Melonie M.; Jolly, Pauline E.; Ehiri, John E; Funkhouser, Ellen; Kempf, Mirjam C.; Hickman, Deborah; Aung, Maung; Zhang, Kui.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 9, e75074, 16.09.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walcott, MM, Jolly, PE, Ehiri, JE, Funkhouser, E, Kempf, MC, Hickman, D, Aung, M & Zhang, K 2013, 'Factors Associated with the Acceptability of Male Circumcision among Men in Jamaica', PLoS One, vol. 8, no. 9, e75074. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0075074
Walcott, Melonie M. ; Jolly, Pauline E. ; Ehiri, John E ; Funkhouser, Ellen ; Kempf, Mirjam C. ; Hickman, Deborah ; Aung, Maung ; Zhang, Kui. / Factors Associated with the Acceptability of Male Circumcision among Men in Jamaica. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 9.
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abstract = "Objectives:To determine the prevalence of male circumcision (MC) among men in the western region of Jamaica, and to identify factors associated with acceptability of MC for self, infants (<1 year) and older sons (1-17 years).Methods:A cross-sectional, interviewer-administered questionnaire survey of 549 men aged 19-54 years was conducted in the western region of Jamaica. The survey included questions about the acceptance of MC for self, infants, and sons before and after an information session about the benefits of MC in preventing HIV/STI transmission. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors that were associated with acceptability of MC. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI) were calculated from the models.Results:Fourteen percent of the men reported that they were circumcised. In the multivariable model, which adjusted for age, education, religion and income, there were increased odds of accepting MC for infants/sons among uncircumcised men who accepted MC for self (AOR=8.1; 95{\%} CI = 4.1-15.9), believed they would experience more pleasure during sex if circumcised (AOR=4.0; 95{\%} CI = 2.0-8.2), and reported having no concerns regarding MC (AOR=3.0; 95{\%} CI = 1.8-4.8). Similarly, uncircumcised men who reported no concerns about MC or who believed that they would experience more pleasure during sex if circumcised were more likely to accept MC for self.Conclusion:Providing men with information about MC increased acceptance of MC for self, infants (<17 years) and sons (1-17 years). Since targeted education on the benefits of male circumcision for prevention of HIV/STI can be effective in increasing acceptability of MC, health professionals should be trained, and willing to discuss MC with men in healthcare facilities and in the community.",
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