Factors related to physicians' willingness to vaccinate girls against HPV: The importance of subjective norms and perceived behavioral control

Natoshia M. Askelson, Shelly Campo, John B. Lowe, Leslie K Dennis, Sandi Smith, Julie Andsager

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study assessed factors related to physicians' intentions to vaccinate patients against human papillomavirus. A random sample of physicians was surveyed. The survey questions focused on the constructs of the Theory of Planned Behavior. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate the relationship of theoretical constructs to intention to vaccinate. Of the 207 physicians who responded, intentions to vaccinate were very high (86.5%). On a scale of 1 to 7 (strongly disagree to strongly agree) physicians had positive attitudes toward the vaccine. Physicians reported the vaccine was a good idea (M = 6.65, SD = 0.79), beneficial (M = 6.64, SD = 0.76), and protected against cervical cancer (M = 6.63, SD = 0.77). Intention to vaccinate was driven by subjective norms (provided by guidelines or standards of practice by important professional and general referent groups) (β = 1.00, p < 0.05) and perceived behavioral control (β = 0.39, p < 0.05). These findings indicate that public health efforts to encourage physicians to adopt the human papillomavirus vaccine should focus on subjective norms, such as those provided by professional organizations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)144-158
Number of pages15
JournalWomen and Health
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Physicians
Vaccines
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Professional Practice
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
General Practice
Public Health
Guidelines

Keywords

  • Human papillomavirus
  • Physicians
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Factors related to physicians' willingness to vaccinate girls against HPV : The importance of subjective norms and perceived behavioral control. / Askelson, Natoshia M.; Campo, Shelly; Lowe, John B.; Dennis, Leslie K; Smith, Sandi; Andsager, Julie.

In: Women and Health, Vol. 50, No. 2, 03.2010, p. 144-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Askelson, Natoshia M. ; Campo, Shelly ; Lowe, John B. ; Dennis, Leslie K ; Smith, Sandi ; Andsager, Julie. / Factors related to physicians' willingness to vaccinate girls against HPV : The importance of subjective norms and perceived behavioral control. In: Women and Health. 2010 ; Vol. 50, No. 2. pp. 144-158.
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