Factors that influence mammography use and breast cancer detection among Mexican-American and African-American women

Rachel Zenuk Garcia, Scott C Carvajal, Anna V. Wilkinson, Patricia A. Thompson, Jesse N. Nodora, Ian K. Komenaka, Abenaa Brewster, Giovanna I. Cruz, Betsy C. Wertheim, Melissa L. Bondy, María Elena Martínez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study examined factors that influence mammography use and breast cancer detection, including education, health insurance, and acculturation, among Mexican-American (MA) and African-American (AA) women. Methods: The study included 670 breast cancer cases (388 MAs and 282 AAs), aged 40-86 years at diagnosis. Data on mammography use, detection, and delay in seeking care were collected via questionnaires and medical records. Using a language-based bidimensional acculturation measure, MAs were classified as English-dominant (n = 67), bilingual (n = 173), and Spanish-dominant (n = 148). Mammography prior to diagnosis was assessed by racial/ethnic acculturation subgroup using logistic regression. Results: In age-adjusted models, mammography use was non-significantly lower among English-dominant (OR = 0.84; 95% CI: 0.45-1.59) and bilingual (OR = 0.86; 95% CI: 0.55-1.35) MAs and significantly lower among Spanish-dominant MAs (OR = 0.53; 95% CI: 0.34-0.83) than among AA women. After adjustment for education or insurance, there was no difference in mammography use by race/ethnicity and acculturation subgroup. Despite high self-reported mammography use (75%), a large proportion of cases reported self-detection (59%) and delay in seeking care >90 days (17%). Conclusions: These findings favor promoting culturally appropriate messaging about the benefits and limitations of mammography, education about breast awareness, and prompt reporting of findings to a health professional.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-173
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

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Mammography
African Americans
Acculturation
Breast Neoplasms
Education
Health Insurance
Insurance
Medical Records
Breast
Language
Logistic Models
Health

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • African-American
  • Mammography
  • Mexican-American
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Factors that influence mammography use and breast cancer detection among Mexican-American and African-American women. / Garcia, Rachel Zenuk; Carvajal, Scott C; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Thompson, Patricia A.; Nodora, Jesse N.; Komenaka, Ian K.; Brewster, Abenaa; Cruz, Giovanna I.; Wertheim, Betsy C.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Martínez, María Elena.

In: Cancer Causes and Control, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 165-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garcia, RZ, Carvajal, SC, Wilkinson, AV, Thompson, PA, Nodora, JN, Komenaka, IK, Brewster, A, Cruz, GI, Wertheim, BC, Bondy, ML & Martínez, ME 2012, 'Factors that influence mammography use and breast cancer detection among Mexican-American and African-American women', Cancer Causes and Control, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 165-173. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-011-9865-x
Garcia, Rachel Zenuk ; Carvajal, Scott C ; Wilkinson, Anna V. ; Thompson, Patricia A. ; Nodora, Jesse N. ; Komenaka, Ian K. ; Brewster, Abenaa ; Cruz, Giovanna I. ; Wertheim, Betsy C. ; Bondy, Melissa L. ; Martínez, María Elena. / Factors that influence mammography use and breast cancer detection among Mexican-American and African-American women. In: Cancer Causes and Control. 2012 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 165-173.
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AU - Komenaka, Ian K.

AU - Brewster, Abenaa

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KW - African-American

KW - Mammography

KW - Mexican-American

KW - Screening

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