Fate of blood meal iron in mosquitoes

Guoli Zhou, Pete Kohlhepp, Dawn Geiser, Maria del Carmen Frasquillo, Luz Vazquez-Moreno, Joy Winzerling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Iron is an essential element of living cells and organisms as a component of numerous metabolic pathways. Hemoglobin and ferric-transferrin in vertebrate host blood are the two major iron sources for female mosquitoes. We used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and radioisotope labeling to quantify the fate of iron supplied from hemoglobin or as transferrin in Aedes aegypti. At the end of the first gonotrophic cycle, ∼87% of the ingested total meal heme iron was excreted, while 7% was distributed into the eggs and 6% was stored in different tissues. In contrast, ∼8% of the iron provided as transferrin was excreted and of that absorbed, 77% was allocated to the eggs and 15% distributed in the tissues. Further analyses indicate that of the iron supplied in a blood meal, ∼7% appears in the eggs and of this iron 98% is from hemoglobin and 2% from ferric-transferrin. Whereas, of iron from a blood meal retained in body of the female, ∼97% is from heme and <1% is from transferrin. Evaluation of iron-binding proteins in hemolymph and egg following intake of 59Fe-transferrin revealed that ferritin is iron loaded in these animals, and indicate that this protein plays a critical role in meal iron transport and iron storage in eggs in A. aegypti.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1169-1178
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Insect Physiology
Volume53
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007

Fingerprint

blood meal
Culicidae
Meals
Iron
iron
transferrin
Transferrin
Eggs
hemoglobin
Hemoglobins
Aedes aegypti
Heme
Iron-Binding Proteins
gonotrophic cycle
heme iron
radiolabeling
Hemolymph
Aedes
atomic absorption spectrometry
ferritin

Keywords

  • Blood meal
  • Egg iron reserve
  • Ferritin
  • Heme iron
  • Iron transport
  • Transferrin iron

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science
  • Physiology

Cite this

Zhou, G., Kohlhepp, P., Geiser, D., Frasquillo, M. D. C., Vazquez-Moreno, L., & Winzerling, J. (2007). Fate of blood meal iron in mosquitoes. Journal of Insect Physiology, 53(11), 1169-1178. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jinsphys.2007.06.009

Fate of blood meal iron in mosquitoes. / Zhou, Guoli; Kohlhepp, Pete; Geiser, Dawn; Frasquillo, Maria del Carmen; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz; Winzerling, Joy.

In: Journal of Insect Physiology, Vol. 53, No. 11, 11.2007, p. 1169-1178.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhou, G, Kohlhepp, P, Geiser, D, Frasquillo, MDC, Vazquez-Moreno, L & Winzerling, J 2007, 'Fate of blood meal iron in mosquitoes', Journal of Insect Physiology, vol. 53, no. 11, pp. 1169-1178. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jinsphys.2007.06.009
Zhou G, Kohlhepp P, Geiser D, Frasquillo MDC, Vazquez-Moreno L, Winzerling J. Fate of blood meal iron in mosquitoes. Journal of Insect Physiology. 2007 Nov;53(11):1169-1178. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jinsphys.2007.06.009
Zhou, Guoli ; Kohlhepp, Pete ; Geiser, Dawn ; Frasquillo, Maria del Carmen ; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz ; Winzerling, Joy. / Fate of blood meal iron in mosquitoes. In: Journal of Insect Physiology. 2007 ; Vol. 53, No. 11. pp. 1169-1178.
@article{14d6ebc3eaa64aa68210c91f4b6bd928,
title = "Fate of blood meal iron in mosquitoes",
abstract = "Iron is an essential element of living cells and organisms as a component of numerous metabolic pathways. Hemoglobin and ferric-transferrin in vertebrate host blood are the two major iron sources for female mosquitoes. We used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and radioisotope labeling to quantify the fate of iron supplied from hemoglobin or as transferrin in Aedes aegypti. At the end of the first gonotrophic cycle, ∼87{\%} of the ingested total meal heme iron was excreted, while 7{\%} was distributed into the eggs and 6{\%} was stored in different tissues. In contrast, ∼8{\%} of the iron provided as transferrin was excreted and of that absorbed, 77{\%} was allocated to the eggs and 15{\%} distributed in the tissues. Further analyses indicate that of the iron supplied in a blood meal, ∼7{\%} appears in the eggs and of this iron 98{\%} is from hemoglobin and 2{\%} from ferric-transferrin. Whereas, of iron from a blood meal retained in body of the female, ∼97{\%} is from heme and <1{\%} is from transferrin. Evaluation of iron-binding proteins in hemolymph and egg following intake of 59Fe-transferrin revealed that ferritin is iron loaded in these animals, and indicate that this protein plays a critical role in meal iron transport and iron storage in eggs in A. aegypti.",
keywords = "Blood meal, Egg iron reserve, Ferritin, Heme iron, Iron transport, Transferrin iron",
author = "Guoli Zhou and Pete Kohlhepp and Dawn Geiser and Frasquillo, {Maria del Carmen} and Luz Vazquez-Moreno and Joy Winzerling",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.jinsphys.2007.06.009",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "53",
pages = "1169--1178",
journal = "Journal of Insect Physiology",
issn = "0022-1910",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fate of blood meal iron in mosquitoes

AU - Zhou, Guoli

AU - Kohlhepp, Pete

AU - Geiser, Dawn

AU - Frasquillo, Maria del Carmen

AU - Vazquez-Moreno, Luz

AU - Winzerling, Joy

PY - 2007/11

Y1 - 2007/11

N2 - Iron is an essential element of living cells and organisms as a component of numerous metabolic pathways. Hemoglobin and ferric-transferrin in vertebrate host blood are the two major iron sources for female mosquitoes. We used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and radioisotope labeling to quantify the fate of iron supplied from hemoglobin or as transferrin in Aedes aegypti. At the end of the first gonotrophic cycle, ∼87% of the ingested total meal heme iron was excreted, while 7% was distributed into the eggs and 6% was stored in different tissues. In contrast, ∼8% of the iron provided as transferrin was excreted and of that absorbed, 77% was allocated to the eggs and 15% distributed in the tissues. Further analyses indicate that of the iron supplied in a blood meal, ∼7% appears in the eggs and of this iron 98% is from hemoglobin and 2% from ferric-transferrin. Whereas, of iron from a blood meal retained in body of the female, ∼97% is from heme and <1% is from transferrin. Evaluation of iron-binding proteins in hemolymph and egg following intake of 59Fe-transferrin revealed that ferritin is iron loaded in these animals, and indicate that this protein plays a critical role in meal iron transport and iron storage in eggs in A. aegypti.

AB - Iron is an essential element of living cells and organisms as a component of numerous metabolic pathways. Hemoglobin and ferric-transferrin in vertebrate host blood are the two major iron sources for female mosquitoes. We used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and radioisotope labeling to quantify the fate of iron supplied from hemoglobin or as transferrin in Aedes aegypti. At the end of the first gonotrophic cycle, ∼87% of the ingested total meal heme iron was excreted, while 7% was distributed into the eggs and 6% was stored in different tissues. In contrast, ∼8% of the iron provided as transferrin was excreted and of that absorbed, 77% was allocated to the eggs and 15% distributed in the tissues. Further analyses indicate that of the iron supplied in a blood meal, ∼7% appears in the eggs and of this iron 98% is from hemoglobin and 2% from ferric-transferrin. Whereas, of iron from a blood meal retained in body of the female, ∼97% is from heme and <1% is from transferrin. Evaluation of iron-binding proteins in hemolymph and egg following intake of 59Fe-transferrin revealed that ferritin is iron loaded in these animals, and indicate that this protein plays a critical role in meal iron transport and iron storage in eggs in A. aegypti.

KW - Blood meal

KW - Egg iron reserve

KW - Ferritin

KW - Heme iron

KW - Iron transport

KW - Transferrin iron

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=35548958227&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=35548958227&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jinsphys.2007.06.009

DO - 10.1016/j.jinsphys.2007.06.009

M3 - Article

C2 - 17689557

AN - SCOPUS:35548958227

VL - 53

SP - 1169

EP - 1178

JO - Journal of Insect Physiology

JF - Journal of Insect Physiology

SN - 0022-1910

IS - 11

ER -