Feasibility of expanding services for very young children in the public mental health setting

Penelope K. Knapp, Sue Ammen, Cindy Arstein-Kerslake, Marie Kanne Poulsen, Ann M Mastergeorge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: A quality-improvement study evaluated the feasibility of training mental health providers to provide mental health screening and relationship-based intervention to expand services for children 0 to 5 years of age in eight California county mental health systems from November 2002 to June 2003. State-level training was provided to more than 582 participants and county-level training to more than 5425 participants, including ongoing supervision. METHOD: Direct services and use of collateral services were tracked. Psychiatric symptoms were screened with new Mental Health Screening and Risk Assessment tools for 388 children (mean age, 34 months). At intake and after intervention (mean of 22 visits), an index sample (93 children) were further characterized by the Diagnostic Classification for Zero to Three and DSM-IV, and parent-child relationship was characterized by the Diagnostic Classification for Zero to Three Parent-Infant Relationship Global Assessment Scale. Providers reported that 41% of their service time was directed to the parent and child together, 35% to the parent alone, and 24% to the child alone. RESULTS: The 93 index children and 295 children in a clinic reference sample were comparable, supporting generalizability. After intervention, Mental Health Screening and Risk Assessment scores were significantly lower. Global Assessment of Functioning scores improved (effect size, 0.35), as did the relationship (Parent-Infant Relationship Global Assessment Scale effect size, 0.16). CONCLUSION: Training mental health staff to provide treatment to infants and preschool children and families in public mental health settings is feasible and leads to an increase in numbers of children served. Copyright 2007

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)152-161
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Mental Health
Public Health
Parent-Child Relations
Feasibility Studies
Preschool Children
Quality Improvement
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Psychiatry

Keywords

  • Early intervention
  • Infant mental health
  • Mental health services: infant
  • Preschool
  • Public mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Feasibility of expanding services for very young children in the public mental health setting. / Knapp, Penelope K.; Ammen, Sue; Arstein-Kerslake, Cindy; Poulsen, Marie Kanne; Mastergeorge, Ann M.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 46, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 152-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Knapp, Penelope K. ; Ammen, Sue ; Arstein-Kerslake, Cindy ; Poulsen, Marie Kanne ; Mastergeorge, Ann M. / Feasibility of expanding services for very young children in the public mental health setting. In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 2007 ; Vol. 46, No. 2. pp. 152-161.
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