Feelings of parental caring predict health status in midlife: A 35-year follow-up of the Harvard Mastery of Stress Study

Linda G. Russek, Gary E. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the early 1950s, multiple-choice scores reflecting feelings of warmth and closeness with parents were obtained from a sample of healthy, undergraduate Harvard men who participated in the Harvard Mastery of Stress Study. Thirty-five years later, detailed medical and psychological histories and medical records were obtained. Ninety-one percent of participants who did not perceive themselves to have had a warm relationship with their mothers (assessed during college) had diagnosed diseases in midlife (including coronary artery disease, hypertension, duodenal ulcer, and alcoholism), as compared to 45% of participants who perceived themselves to have had a warm relationship with their mothers. A similar association between perceived warmth and closeness and future illness was obtained for fathers. Since parents are usually the most meaningful source of social support in early life, the perception of parental love and caring may have important effects on biological and psychological health and illness throughout life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 1997

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease
  • caring
  • health
  • love
  • social support
  • stress
  • warmth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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