Femoral central venous catheter-associated deep venous thrombosis in children with diabetic ketoacidosis

Juan A. Gutierrez, Rochelle Bagatell, Meredith P. Samson, Andreas A Theodorou, Robert A. Berg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe the incidence of clinical deep venous thrombosis associated with femoral central venous catheters (CVC-DVT) in children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Design: Retrospective case-matched control series. Setting: Pediatric intensive care units of two university-affiliated hospitals. Patients: All eight pediatric DKA patients with femoral central venous catheters between 1998 and 2001, and 16 age-matched control patients with femoral central venous catheters and circulatory shock. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: The records of all children with DKA and the control patients were reviewed. CVC-DVT was defined as persistent ipsilateral leg swelling after removal of a femoral central venous catheter. Control patients with coagulopathies, thrombocytopenia, cancer, and hyperglycemia were excluded. Four of eight patients with DKA developed CVC-DVT compared with none of the 16 control patients (p = .007, Fisher's exact test). All four patients with DKA and CVC-DVT were <3 yrs old. Doppler ultrasound examination was performed on three of the four patients with clinical CVC-DVT, confirming the diagnosis in each case. Conclusions: This study suggests that young children with DKA have an increased incidence of clinical DVT associated with the placement of femoral central venous catheters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)80-83
Number of pages4
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

Fingerprint

Diabetic Ketoacidosis
Central Venous Catheters
Thigh
Venous Thrombosis
Doppler Ultrasonography
Pediatric Intensive Care Units
Incidence
Hyperglycemia
Thrombocytopenia
Shock
Leg
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Catheterization
  • Central venous
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis
  • Hyperglycemia
  • Pediatrics
  • Shock
  • Thrombophilia
  • Venous thrombosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Femoral central venous catheter-associated deep venous thrombosis in children with diabetic ketoacidosis. / Gutierrez, Juan A.; Bagatell, Rochelle; Samson, Meredith P.; Theodorou, Andreas A; Berg, Robert A.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 80-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gutierrez, Juan A. ; Bagatell, Rochelle ; Samson, Meredith P. ; Theodorou, Andreas A ; Berg, Robert A. / Femoral central venous catheter-associated deep venous thrombosis in children with diabetic ketoacidosis. In: Critical Care Medicine. 2003 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 80-83.
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