Field verification of an integrated hydraulic and multi-species water quality model

Matthew T. Alexander, Dominic L. Boccelli

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Water distribution system network models are used to simulate both hydraulic and water quality characteristics in water distribution systems. This study provides the first comprehensive evaluation of a multi-species chloramine model through the use of field-scale measurements and distribution system network modeling. Hydraulic and multi-species water quality simulations were performed using EPANET-MSX. This investigation was used to determine knowledge gaps between actual distribution system performance and advanced water quality models. The multi-species model was found to represent some species satisfactorily, while other species were poorly characterized throughout the distribution system. These inconsistencies may be attributed to reactions at the pipe wall, biological nitrification, or misrepresentation of network hydraulics, which were not considered in the model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWater Distribution Systems Analysis 2010 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference, WDSA 2010
Pages687-696
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event12th Annual International Conference on Water Distribution Systems Analysis 2010, WDSA 2010 - Tucson, AZ, United States
Duration: Sep 12 2010Sep 15 2010

Publication series

NameWater Distribution Systems Analysis 2010 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference, WDSA 2010

Other

Other12th Annual International Conference on Water Distribution Systems Analysis 2010, WDSA 2010
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityTucson, AZ
Period9/12/109/15/10

Keywords

  • EPANET-MSX
  • chloramine
  • field work
  • water quality model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology

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