Fighting the floating correlations: Expectations and complications in extracting statistical correlations from the string theory landscape

Keith R Dienes, Michael Lennek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The realization that string theory gives rise to a huge landscape of vacuum solutions has recently prompted a statistical approach towards extracting phenomenological predictions from string theory. Unfortunately, for most classes of string models, direct enumeration of all solutions is not computationally feasible and thus statistical studies must resort to other methods in order to extract meaningful information. In this paper, we discuss some of the issues that arise when attempting to extract statistical correlations from a large data set to which our computational access is necessarily limited. Our main focus is the problem of "floating correlations." As we discuss, this problem is endemic to investigations of this type and reflects the fact that not all physically distinct string models are equally likely to be sampled in any random search through the landscape, thereby causing statistical correlations to float as a function of sample size. We propose several possible methods that can be used to overcome this problem, and we show through explicit examples that these methods lead to correlations and statistical distributions which are not only stable as a function of sample size, but which differ significantly from those which would have been naïvely apparent from only a partial data set.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number026008
JournalPhysical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology
Volume75
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 29 2007

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statistical correlation
String Theory
Complications
string theory
floating
strings
enumeration
floats
statistical distributions
Sample Size
Strings
Realization Theory
Equally likely
vacuum
Random Search
Statistical Distribution
predictions
Large Data Sets
Enumeration
Vacuum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Nuclear and High Energy Physics
  • Mathematical Physics

Cite this

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