FINITE DIFFERENCE AND FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION OF FIELD WATER UPTAKE BY PLANTS.

Reinder A. Feddes, Piotr Kowalik, Shlomo P Neuman, Eshel Bresler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The problem of nonsteady flow of water in a soil-plant system can be described by adding a sink term to the continuity equation for soil water flow. The sink term is defined in two different ways. Firstly, it is considered to be dependent on the hydraulic conductivity of the soil, on the difference in pressure head between the soil and the root-soil interface and some root effectiveness function. Secondly, the sink is taken to be a prescribed function of the soil water content. The partial differential equation applying to the first problem is solved by both a finite difference and a finite element technique, that applying to the second problem by a finite difference approach. The purpose of this paper is to verify the numerical methods against field measurements, to compare the results obtained by the three numerical methods and to show how the finite element method can be applied to complex but realistic two-dimensional flow situations. Two examples are given.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHydrol Sci BULL Sci Hydrol
Pages81-98
Number of pages18
Volume21
Edition1
StatePublished - Mar 1975
Externally publishedYes
EventSymp and Workshops on the Appl of Math Model in Hydrol and Water Resour Syst - Bratislava, Czech
Duration: Sep 8 1975Sep 13 1975

Other

OtherSymp and Workshops on the Appl of Math Model in Hydrol and Water Resour Syst
CityBratislava, Czech
Period9/8/759/13/75

Fingerprint

Soils
Water
Numerical methods
Flow of water
Hydraulic conductivity
Water content
Partial differential equations
Finite element method

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Feddes, R. A., Kowalik, P., Neuman, S. P., & Bresler, E. (1975). FINITE DIFFERENCE AND FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION OF FIELD WATER UPTAKE BY PLANTS. In Hydrol Sci BULL Sci Hydrol (1 ed., Vol. 21, pp. 81-98)

FINITE DIFFERENCE AND FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION OF FIELD WATER UPTAKE BY PLANTS. / Feddes, Reinder A.; Kowalik, Piotr; Neuman, Shlomo P; Bresler, Eshel.

Hydrol Sci BULL Sci Hydrol. Vol. 21 1. ed. 1975. p. 81-98.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Feddes, RA, Kowalik, P, Neuman, SP & Bresler, E 1975, FINITE DIFFERENCE AND FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION OF FIELD WATER UPTAKE BY PLANTS. in Hydrol Sci BULL Sci Hydrol. 1 edn, vol. 21, pp. 81-98, Symp and Workshops on the Appl of Math Model in Hydrol and Water Resour Syst, Bratislava, Czech, 9/8/75.
Feddes RA, Kowalik P, Neuman SP, Bresler E. FINITE DIFFERENCE AND FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION OF FIELD WATER UPTAKE BY PLANTS. In Hydrol Sci BULL Sci Hydrol. 1 ed. Vol. 21. 1975. p. 81-98
Feddes, Reinder A. ; Kowalik, Piotr ; Neuman, Shlomo P ; Bresler, Eshel. / FINITE DIFFERENCE AND FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION OF FIELD WATER UPTAKE BY PLANTS. Hydrol Sci BULL Sci Hydrol. Vol. 21 1. ed. 1975. pp. 81-98
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