Finite-difference time-domain modeling of dispersive-material photonic bandgap structures

Richard W Ziolkowski, Masahiro Tanaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dispersion properties are introduced into photonic bandgap (PBG) structures by incorporating a Lorentz material model for the polarization fields in the component materials such that the effects of dispersion on a variety of 1D PBG structures can be studied in detail. Considering PBG structures composed of both metallic and dielectric materials, ABCD matrix and finite difference time domain modeling shows that dispersive effects significantly alter the optical operating characteristics of a PBG structure, particularly its frequency response. With their reflection and transmission characteristics known, defects are incorporated into the PBG structures to form microcavities. These microcavities outperform their nondispersive counterparts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)930-940
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science, and Vision
Volume16
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1999

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Optics and Photonics
Photonics
Energy gap
Microcavities
Frequency response
Polarization
Defects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

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