“Firecrackers” and “Duds”: Cooperating Music Teachers' Perspectives on Their Relationships With Student Teachers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative research study is to examine the perspective of the cooperating music teacher in the student teaching experience. Three cooperating music teachers serve as participants in the study: one high school and elementary band director, one middle school choral director, and one elementary through high school orchestra director. Data are collected through interviews and e-mail prompts and then coded and analyzed for emerging themes. Power emerges as a strong theme. When discussing relationships with student teachers, cooperating teachers describe how power is shared; the power structures are defined by the researcher on a continuum from student—teacher relationship to team-teaching relationship to a collaborative partnership. Generally, the cooperating music teachers find the more collaborative partnerships to be the most satisfying.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-15
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Music Teacher Education
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

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music teacher
student teacher
director
team teaching
e-mail
school
qualitative research
Teaching
teacher
interview
Music Teacher
experience
student
High School

Keywords

  • cooperating teachers
  • music education
  • student teaching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Music

Cite this

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