First experiences with eBlocks as an assistive technology for individuals with autistic spectrum condition

Jennifer Drain, Mario Riojas, Susan Lysecky, Jerzy W Rozenblit

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The integration of technology into autistic classrooms has shown promising results, including an increase in attention span, creativity, and social skills. We have introduced a low-cost learning technology composed by electronic modules called eBlocks to an autistic middle-school classroom. The participants of this study had the opportunity to learn concepts in the design and implementation of electronic systems by using the eBlocks. Our initial findings show that the integration of hands-on real world based projects, centered on the design of systems for a Smart House estimulated peer-to-peer interaction and teamwork, while promoting spontaneous creative thinking. We present our experiences with six students, including summaries of our overall experiences, teacher's pre-and post-surveys, and the examination of students' work.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event41st Annual Frontiers in Education Conference: Celebrating 41 Years of Monumental Innovations from Around the World, FIE 2011 - Rapid City, SD, United States
Duration: Oct 12 2011Nov 15 2011

Other

Other41st Annual Frontiers in Education Conference: Celebrating 41 Years of Monumental Innovations from Around the World, FIE 2011
CountryUnited States
CityRapid City, SD
Period10/12/1111/15/11

Fingerprint

electronics
Students
Intelligent buildings
classroom
teamwork
creativity
experience
student
examination
teacher
costs
interaction
learning
Costs

Keywords

  • autism
  • disabilities studies
  • human-computer interaction in education
  • Learning technologies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Software
  • Education

Cite this

Drain, J., Riojas, M., Lysecky, S., & Rozenblit, J. W. (2011). First experiences with eBlocks as an assistive technology for individuals with autistic spectrum condition. In Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE [6143050] https://doi.org/10.1109/FIE.2011.6143050

First experiences with eBlocks as an assistive technology for individuals with autistic spectrum condition. / Drain, Jennifer; Riojas, Mario; Lysecky, Susan; Rozenblit, Jerzy W.

Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. 2011. 6143050.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Drain, J, Riojas, M, Lysecky, S & Rozenblit, JW 2011, First experiences with eBlocks as an assistive technology for individuals with autistic spectrum condition. in Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE., 6143050, 41st Annual Frontiers in Education Conference: Celebrating 41 Years of Monumental Innovations from Around the World, FIE 2011, Rapid City, SD, United States, 10/12/11. https://doi.org/10.1109/FIE.2011.6143050
Drain, Jennifer ; Riojas, Mario ; Lysecky, Susan ; Rozenblit, Jerzy W. / First experiences with eBlocks as an assistive technology for individuals with autistic spectrum condition. Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. 2011.
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