First report: Linear incision for placement of a magnetically coupled bone-anchored hearing implant

Jonnae Y. Barry, Saranya Reghunathan, Abraham Jacob

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Discuss use of a linear incision for placement of a magnetically coupled bone anchored hearing implant. Methods: Case series. Results: Two patients underwent placement of magnetically coupled bone-anchored hearing implants (BAHI) through linear incisions. The first, a 40-year-old female with congenital single-sided deafness, previously had successful implantation of a percutaneous bone anchored hearing implant through a linear incision; unfortunately, she developed pain and intermittent drainage at her abutment site with time, resulting in a request for removal of her device. As an alternative to complete removal, we offered to replace the percutaneous implant with a magnetically coupled BAHI, employing the same linear incision previously. The second patient, a 53-year-old obese female with limited neck mobility and mixed hearing loss, underwent primary placement of a magnetically coupled BAHI through a linear incision. Limitations in neck mobility and patient body habitus precluded use of a traditional C-shaped incision. Both patients underwent surgery successfully, healed without incident, had their devices activated 6 weeks after their procedures, and are able to wear their implants more than 8 hours per day without discomfort. Conclusion: Surgical techniques for bone-anchored implants continue to evolve. Though manufacturers of magnetically coupled devices recommend using C-shaped incisions with large skin flaps, our first reported cases suggest that a small linear incision immediately overlying the implant magnet may be an acceptable alternative. Potential benefits include a smaller incision, less hair removal, smaller flap, decreased surgical time, and less postoperative pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-224
Number of pages4
JournalOtology and Neurotology
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Hearing
Bone and Bones
Neck
Mixed Conductive-Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Hair Removal
Device Removal
Equipment and Supplies
Magnets
Deafness
Operative Time
Postoperative Pain
Drainage
Pain
Skin

Keywords

  • BAHA
  • Bone anchored hearing implant
  • Magnetically coupled device
  • Osteointegrating device

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

First report : Linear incision for placement of a magnetically coupled bone-anchored hearing implant. / Barry, Jonnae Y.; Reghunathan, Saranya; Jacob, Abraham.

In: Otology and Neurotology, Vol. 38, No. 2, 2017, p. 221-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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