Forecasting the effects of global warming on biodiversity

Daniel B. Botkin, Henrik Saxe, Miguel B. Araújo, Richard Betts, Richard H W Bradshaw, Tomas Cedhagen, Peter Chesson, Terry P. Dawson, Julie R. Etterson, Daniel P. Faith, Simon Ferrier, Antoine Guisan, Anja Skjoldborg Hansen, David W. Hilbert, Craig Loehle, Chris Margules, Mark New, Matthew J. Sobel, David R B Stockwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

391 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The demand for accurate forecasting of the effects of global warming on biodiversity is growing, but current methods for forecasting have limitations. In this article, we compare and discuss the different uses of four forecasting methods: (1) models that consider species individually, (2) niche-theory models that group species by habitat (more specifically, by environmental conditions under which a species can persist or does persist), (3) general circulation models and coupled ocean-atmosphere-biosphere models, and (4) species-area curve models that consider all species or large aggregates of species. After outlining the different uses and limitations of these methods, we make eight primary suggestions for improving forecasts. We find that greater use of the fossil record and of modern genetic studies would improve forecasting methods. We note a Quaternary conundrum: While current empirical and theoretical ecological results suggest that many species could be at risk from global warming, during the recent ice ages surprisingly few species became extinct. The potential resolution of this conundrum gives insights into the requirements for more accurate and reliable forecasting. Our eight suggestions also point to constructive synergies in the solution to the different problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-236
Number of pages10
JournalBioScience
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

Fingerprint

Global Warming
Biodiversity
global warming
biodiversity
forecasting method
General Circulation Models
methodology
Ice
niches
Atmosphere
ice
fossils
Oceans and Seas
oceans
species-area relationship
Ecosystem
environmental factors
effect
fossil record
biosphere

Keywords

  • Biodiversity
  • Forecasting
  • Global warming
  • Modeling
  • Quaternary conundrum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Botkin, D. B., Saxe, H., Araújo, M. B., Betts, R., Bradshaw, R. H. W., Cedhagen, T., ... Stockwell, D. R. B. (2007). Forecasting the effects of global warming on biodiversity. BioScience, 57(3), 227-236. https://doi.org/10.1641/B570306

Forecasting the effects of global warming on biodiversity. / Botkin, Daniel B.; Saxe, Henrik; Araújo, Miguel B.; Betts, Richard; Bradshaw, Richard H W; Cedhagen, Tomas; Chesson, Peter; Dawson, Terry P.; Etterson, Julie R.; Faith, Daniel P.; Ferrier, Simon; Guisan, Antoine; Hansen, Anja Skjoldborg; Hilbert, David W.; Loehle, Craig; Margules, Chris; New, Mark; Sobel, Matthew J.; Stockwell, David R B.

In: BioScience, Vol. 57, No. 3, 03.2007, p. 227-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Botkin, DB, Saxe, H, Araújo, MB, Betts, R, Bradshaw, RHW, Cedhagen, T, Chesson, P, Dawson, TP, Etterson, JR, Faith, DP, Ferrier, S, Guisan, A, Hansen, AS, Hilbert, DW, Loehle, C, Margules, C, New, M, Sobel, MJ & Stockwell, DRB 2007, 'Forecasting the effects of global warming on biodiversity', BioScience, vol. 57, no. 3, pp. 227-236. https://doi.org/10.1641/B570306
Botkin DB, Saxe H, Araújo MB, Betts R, Bradshaw RHW, Cedhagen T et al. Forecasting the effects of global warming on biodiversity. BioScience. 2007 Mar;57(3):227-236. https://doi.org/10.1641/B570306
Botkin, Daniel B. ; Saxe, Henrik ; Araújo, Miguel B. ; Betts, Richard ; Bradshaw, Richard H W ; Cedhagen, Tomas ; Chesson, Peter ; Dawson, Terry P. ; Etterson, Julie R. ; Faith, Daniel P. ; Ferrier, Simon ; Guisan, Antoine ; Hansen, Anja Skjoldborg ; Hilbert, David W. ; Loehle, Craig ; Margules, Chris ; New, Mark ; Sobel, Matthew J. ; Stockwell, David R B. / Forecasting the effects of global warming on biodiversity. In: BioScience. 2007 ; Vol. 57, No. 3. pp. 227-236.
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