Fostering social and emotional intelligence: What are the best current strategies in parenting?

Chris Segrin, Jeanne Flora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This review focuses on parenting practices that are beneficial or antagonistic to the development of emotional and social intelligence in children. We start by reviewing the somewhat nebulous concepts of emotional and social intelligence. This is followed by an examination of the association between well-known parenting styles such as authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and directive parenting and various indicators of child emotional and social intelligence. The strategic emotion-coaching parenting style is also examined for its connections to comparable child outcomes. Parenting practices such as inductive discipline and parental availability also appear to cultivate emotional and social intelligence in children. Finally, overparenting is discussed as a parenting practice that apparently corrupts the development of these traits in emerging adults. We conclude that best practices, where emotional intelligence and social intelligence are the benchmarks, blend parental care and concern with a degree of parental demands on children that are appropriate for their developmental stage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere12439
JournalSocial and Personality Psychology Compass
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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