Fragile X Protein is required for inhibition of insulin signaling and regulates glial-dependent neuroblast reactivation in the developing brain

Matthew A. Callan, Nicole Clements, Nicholas Ahrendt, Daniela C Zarnescu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited mental disability and known cause of autism. It is caused by loss of function for the RNA binding protein FMRP, which has been demonstrated to regulate several aspects of RNA metabolism including transport, stability and translation at synapses. Recently, FMRP has been implicated in neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation both in cultured neurospheres as well as in vivo mouse and fly models of FXS. We have previously shown that FMRP deficient Drosophila neuroblasts upregulate Cyclin E, prematurely exit quiescence, and overproliferate to generate on average 16% more neurons. Here we further investigate FMRP's role during early development using the Drosophila larval brain as a model. Using tissue specific RNAi we find that FMRP is required sequentially, first in neuroblasts and then in glia, to regulate exit from quiescence as measured by Cyclin E expression in the brain. Furthermore, we tested the hypothesis that FMRP controls brain development by regulating the insulin signaling pathway, which has been recently shown to regulate neuroblast exit from quiescence. Our data indicate that phosphoAkt, a readout of insulin signaling, is upregulated in dFmr1 brains at the time when FMRP is required in glia for neuroblast reactivation. In addition, dFmr1 interacts genetically with dFoxO, a transcriptional regulator of insulin signaling. Our results provide the first evidence that FMRP is required in vivo, in glia for neuroblast reactivation and suggest that it may do so by regulating the output of the insulin signaling pathway. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA-Binding Proteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-161
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Research
Volume1462
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 26 2012

Fingerprint

Neuroglia
Insulin
Fragile X Syndrome
Cyclin E
RNA-Binding Proteins
Brain
Drosophila
Proteins
Neural Stem Cells
Autistic Disorder
RNA Interference
Diptera
Synapses
Cell Differentiation
Up-Regulation
Cell Proliferation
RNA
Neurons
Inhibition (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Exit from quiescence
  • Fragile X Protein
  • Glia
  • Insulin signaling
  • Neural stem cell
  • Proliferation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Fragile X Protein is required for inhibition of insulin signaling and regulates glial-dependent neuroblast reactivation in the developing brain. / Callan, Matthew A.; Clements, Nicole; Ahrendt, Nicholas; Zarnescu, Daniela C.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1462, 26.06.2012, p. 151-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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