Frequency measurement of spacecraft pointing using the hirise camera

Alan Delamere, Jim Bergstrom, Jim Chapel, Audrie Fennema, Randolph Kirk, Alfred McEwen, Sarah Mattson

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) carries a unique instrument capable of determinating small spacecraft disturbances in the micro-radian range. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera has been returning quality images since MRO entered its primary Science phase in November 2006. HiRISE data demonstrates that spacecraft motions are smaller than required in high stability mode, so even higher-resolution imaging would not be limited by pointing jitter. Lower-frequency disturbances introduce geometric distortions, but the overlapping HiRISE detectors enable measuring and removing this jitter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)815-828
Number of pages14
JournalAdvances in the Astronautical Sciences
Volume149
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Event2013 36th Annual AAS Rocky Mountain Section Guidance and Control Conference, Guidance and Control 2013 - Breckenridge, CO, United States
Duration: Feb 1 2013Feb 6 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Space and Planetary Science

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  • Cite this

    Delamere, A., Bergstrom, J., Chapel, J., Fennema, A., Kirk, R., McEwen, A., & Mattson, S. (2013). Frequency measurement of spacecraft pointing using the hirise camera. Advances in the Astronautical Sciences, 149, 815-828.