From goods to service(s): Divergences and convergences of logics

Stephen L. Vargo, Robert F Lusch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

455 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are two logics or mindsets from which to consider and motivate a transition from goods to service(s). The first, "goods-dominant (G-D) logic", views services in terms of a type of (e.g., intangible) good and implies that goods production and distribution practices should be modified to deal with the differences between tangible goods and services. The second logic, "service-dominant (S-D) logic", considers service - a process of using ones resources for the benefit of and in conjunction with another party - as the fundamental purpose of economic exchange and implies the need for a revised, service-driven framework for all of marketing. This transition to a service-centered logic is consistent with and partially derived from a similar transition found in the business-marketing literature - for example, its shift to understanding exchange in terms value rather than products and networks rather than dyads. It also parallels transitions in other sub-disciplines, such as service marketing. These parallels and the implications for marketing theory and practice of a full transition to a service-logic are explored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-259
Number of pages6
JournalIndustrial Marketing Management
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008

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Logic
Divergence
Marketing
Marketing practices
Services marketing
Intangibles
Dyads
Service-dominant logic
Mindset
Business marketing
Economic exchange
Marketing theory
Resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing

Cite this

From goods to service(s) : Divergences and convergences of logics. / Vargo, Stephen L.; Lusch, Robert F.

In: Industrial Marketing Management, Vol. 37, No. 3, 05.2008, p. 254-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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