From migrant farmworkers to first generation latina/o students: Factors predicting college outcomes for students participating in the college assistance migrant program

Julian J. Mendez, Sheri A Bauman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines factors associated with college outcomes in a migrant Latina/o college student sample enrolled in the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP). We also examine the relationship between CAMP services and students’ academic perceptions (i.e., college academic self-efficacy, academic resilience, and school connectedness). High school achievement and academic resilience were significant positive predictors of college GPA, while living on-campus was a negative predictor. Financial aid in the form of loans, having family responsibilities, and working full-time off campus were negative predictors of persistence, while involvement in CAMP’s personal and academic counseling services was a positive predictor. Implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-208
Number of pages36
JournalReview of Higher Education
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Fingerprint

first generation
migrant
assistance
student
resilience
financial aid
school
loan
self-efficacy
persistence
counseling
responsibility

Keywords

  • College
  • Latina/o students
  • Migrant
  • Retention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

@article{89d74c67384646cabdc2829c2ae9174e,
title = "From migrant farmworkers to first generation latina/o students: Factors predicting college outcomes for students participating in the college assistance migrant program",
abstract = "This article examines factors associated with college outcomes in a migrant Latina/o college student sample enrolled in the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP). We also examine the relationship between CAMP services and students’ academic perceptions (i.e., college academic self-efficacy, academic resilience, and school connectedness). High school achievement and academic resilience were significant positive predictors of college GPA, while living on-campus was a negative predictor. Financial aid in the form of loans, having family responsibilities, and working full-time off campus were negative predictors of persistence, while involvement in CAMP’s personal and academic counseling services was a positive predictor. Implications are discussed.",
keywords = "College, Latina/o students, Migrant, Retention",
author = "Mendez, {Julian J.} and Bauman, {Sheri A}",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1353/rhe.2018.0037",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "173--208",
journal = "Review of Higher Education",
issn = "0162-5748",
publisher = "Johns Hopkins University Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - From migrant farmworkers to first generation latina/o students

T2 - Factors predicting college outcomes for students participating in the college assistance migrant program

AU - Mendez, Julian J.

AU - Bauman, Sheri A

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - This article examines factors associated with college outcomes in a migrant Latina/o college student sample enrolled in the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP). We also examine the relationship between CAMP services and students’ academic perceptions (i.e., college academic self-efficacy, academic resilience, and school connectedness). High school achievement and academic resilience were significant positive predictors of college GPA, while living on-campus was a negative predictor. Financial aid in the form of loans, having family responsibilities, and working full-time off campus were negative predictors of persistence, while involvement in CAMP’s personal and academic counseling services was a positive predictor. Implications are discussed.

AB - This article examines factors associated with college outcomes in a migrant Latina/o college student sample enrolled in the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP). We also examine the relationship between CAMP services and students’ academic perceptions (i.e., college academic self-efficacy, academic resilience, and school connectedness). High school achievement and academic resilience were significant positive predictors of college GPA, while living on-campus was a negative predictor. Financial aid in the form of loans, having family responsibilities, and working full-time off campus were negative predictors of persistence, while involvement in CAMP’s personal and academic counseling services was a positive predictor. Implications are discussed.

KW - College

KW - Latina/o students

KW - Migrant

KW - Retention

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054718433&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85054718433&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1353/rhe.2018.0037

DO - 10.1353/rhe.2018.0037

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85054718433

VL - 42

SP - 173

EP - 208

JO - Review of Higher Education

JF - Review of Higher Education

SN - 0162-5748

IS - 1

ER -