Frontal sinus surgery: its evolution, present standard of care, and recommendations for current use.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

From a historical perspective, frontal sinus surgery has evolved from radical, highly invasive, disfiguring approaches to function-preserving, minimally invasive, and non-disfiguring intranasal procedures. Most sinus surgeons would agree that a sound surgical procedure is one that relieves patients' symptoms and provides a safe sinus in which future intracranial and orbital complications will not occur. For the future, sinus surgeons are searching for the ideal procedure, ie, one that is minimally invasive, reversible, and ensures the patient a safe frontal sinus for the long term. The ideal surgery will also leave minimal morbidity, will leave no cosmetic defect, and will allow for easy postoperative surveillance. To achieve this new standard in frontal sinus surgery, continuous refinements are required in the medical management and understanding of the disease processes that undermine long-term surgical success. Further advancements in instrumentation and visualization techniques are also necessary to enhance surgical precision, spare mucosa, and prevent the scarring and neo-osteogenesis that may cause surgical failures. Perhaps the most important development may be in the selection criteria for appropriate candidates who will benefit most from frontal sinus surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-19
Number of pages7
JournalThe Annals of otology, rhinology & laryngology. Supplement.
Volume196
StatePublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Frontal Sinus
Standard of Care
Disease Management
Osteogenesis
Cosmetics
Patient Selection
Cicatrix
Mucous Membrane
Morbidity
Surgeons

Cite this

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abstract = "From a historical perspective, frontal sinus surgery has evolved from radical, highly invasive, disfiguring approaches to function-preserving, minimally invasive, and non-disfiguring intranasal procedures. Most sinus surgeons would agree that a sound surgical procedure is one that relieves patients' symptoms and provides a safe sinus in which future intracranial and orbital complications will not occur. For the future, sinus surgeons are searching for the ideal procedure, ie, one that is minimally invasive, reversible, and ensures the patient a safe frontal sinus for the long term. The ideal surgery will also leave minimal morbidity, will leave no cosmetic defect, and will allow for easy postoperative surveillance. To achieve this new standard in frontal sinus surgery, continuous refinements are required in the medical management and understanding of the disease processes that undermine long-term surgical success. Further advancements in instrumentation and visualization techniques are also necessary to enhance surgical precision, spare mucosa, and prevent the scarring and neo-osteogenesis that may cause surgical failures. Perhaps the most important development may be in the selection criteria for appropriate candidates who will benefit most from frontal sinus surgery.",
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