Gaming, Adiposity, and Obesogenic Behaviors among Children

Tom Baranowski, Kristi B. Adamo, Melanie D Hingle, Ralph Maddison, Ann Maloney, Monique Simons, Amanda Staiano

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Videogames in general have been maligned for causing obesity because of their inherent sedentariness, whereas exergames have been both maligned for requiring low levels of activity and extolled for requiring physical activity to move game play along. The intensity and duration of physical activity resulting from exergame play have shown varying results, and they have been explored for use in obesity treatment and prevention, primarily among children. Other videogames have been developed and tested to help children change their diet and physical activity practices with various outcomes. As a field of inquiry, we are in the earliest stages of understanding how, or under what circumstances, videogames can influence all these behavioral and health outcomes. To deal with these complexities, we have assembled a group of investigators who have made important, but diverse, contributions to this research agenda and asked them to address five key child obesity-related issues in a Roundtable format. Brief biosketches are presented at the end of this article.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-126
Number of pages8
JournalGames for health journal
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

Fingerprint

Adiposity
Child Behavior
Nutrition
Health
Exercise
Obesity
Pediatric Obesity
Research Personnel
Diet
Research
health
Group
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Baranowski, T., Adamo, K. B., Hingle, M. D., Maddison, R., Maloney, A., Simons, M., & Staiano, A. (2013). Gaming, Adiposity, and Obesogenic Behaviors among Children. Games for health journal, 2(3), 119-126. https://doi.org/10.1089/g4h.2013.0034

Gaming, Adiposity, and Obesogenic Behaviors among Children. / Baranowski, Tom; Adamo, Kristi B.; Hingle, Melanie D; Maddison, Ralph; Maloney, Ann; Simons, Monique; Staiano, Amanda.

In: Games for health journal, Vol. 2, No. 3, 01.06.2013, p. 119-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Baranowski, T, Adamo, KB, Hingle, MD, Maddison, R, Maloney, A, Simons, M & Staiano, A 2013, 'Gaming, Adiposity, and Obesogenic Behaviors among Children', Games for health journal, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 119-126. https://doi.org/10.1089/g4h.2013.0034
Baranowski T, Adamo KB, Hingle MD, Maddison R, Maloney A, Simons M et al. Gaming, Adiposity, and Obesogenic Behaviors among Children. Games for health journal. 2013 Jun 1;2(3):119-126. https://doi.org/10.1089/g4h.2013.0034
Baranowski, Tom ; Adamo, Kristi B. ; Hingle, Melanie D ; Maddison, Ralph ; Maloney, Ann ; Simons, Monique ; Staiano, Amanda. / Gaming, Adiposity, and Obesogenic Behaviors among Children. In: Games for health journal. 2013 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 119-126.
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