Gamma-Ray Bursts and the Early Star-Formation History

GRBs and z> 4 Star-Formation

R. Chary, P. Petitjean, Brant E Robertson, M. Trenti, E. Vangioni

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We review the uncertainties in high-z star-formation rate (SFR) measures and the constraints that one obtains from high-z gamma-ray burst (GRB) rates on them. We show that at the present time, the GRB rates per unit star-formation at z> 3 are higher than at lower redshift. There could be a multitude of reasons for this: a stellar metallicity bias for GRB production, a top-heavy initial mass function (IMF) and/or missing a significant fraction of star-formation in field galaxy surveys due to incompleteness, surface brightness limitations and cosmic variance. We also compare metallicity predictions made using a hierarchical model of cosmic chemical evolution based on two recently proposed SFRs, one based on the observed galaxy luminosity function at high redshift and one based on the GRB rate and find that within the considerable scatter in metal abundance measures, they both are consistent with the data. Analyzing the ensemble of different measurements together, we conclude that despite metallicity biases, GRBs may be a less biased probe of star-formation at z> 3 than at z< 2. There is likely to be a common origin to the high GRB rate per unit star-formation and the high observed Lyman-continuum production rate in high redshift galaxies and that this may be due to a relative overabundance of stars with mass >25M⊙ which are likely GRB progenitors. We also find that to reconcile these measurements with the Thomson scattering cross section of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons measured by Planck, the escape fraction of Lyman-continuum photons from galaxies must be low, about ∼15 % or less and that the clumping factor of the IGM is likely to be small, ∼3. Finally, we demonstrate that GRBs are unique probes of metallicity evolution in low-mass galaxy samples and that GRB hosts likely lost a significant fraction of metals to the intergalactic medium (IGM) due to feedback processes such as stellar winds and supernovae.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-194
Number of pages14
JournalSpace Science Reviews
Volume202
Issue number1-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

early stars
gamma ray bursts
star formation
histories
metallicity
history
galaxies
intergalactic media
probe
metal
field survey
Thomson scattering
probes
cross section
chemical evolution
scattering
stellar winds
photons
star formation rate
scattering cross sections

Keywords

  • Chemical abundances
  • Gamma ray bursts
  • Reionization
  • Star formation history

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Gamma-Ray Bursts and the Early Star-Formation History : GRBs and z> 4 Star-Formation. / Chary, R.; Petitjean, P.; Robertson, Brant E; Trenti, M.; Vangioni, E.

In: Space Science Reviews, Vol. 202, No. 1-4, 01.12.2016, p. 181-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Chary, R. ; Petitjean, P. ; Robertson, Brant E ; Trenti, M. ; Vangioni, E. / Gamma-Ray Bursts and the Early Star-Formation History : GRBs and z> 4 Star-Formation. In: Space Science Reviews. 2016 ; Vol. 202, No. 1-4. pp. 181-194.
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