Gap junction permeability is diminished in proliferating vascular smooth muscle cells

David T. Kurjiaka, Timothy D. Steele, Mary V. Olsen, Janis M Burt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In atherosclerosis and hypertension, vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are stimulated to proliferate and exhibit enhanced gap junction protein expression. Our goal was to determine whether gap junction function differs in proliferating vs. growth-arrested SMCs. A7r5 cells (embryonic rat aortic SMCs) did not proliferate in media with reduced serum (~ 90% of cells in G0/G1 phase after 48-96 h in 1% fetal bovine serum). Dye coupling was less but electrical coupling was comparable in proliferating vs. growth-arrested A7r5 cells, suggesting differences in junctional permselectivity. In growth- arrested cells, junctional conductances measured with potassium glutamate, tetraethylammonium chloride, and KCl were well predicted by the conductivities of these solutions. In contrast, junctional conductances measured with potassium glutamate and tetraethylammonium chloride in proliferating cells were significantly greater than predicted by the conductivities of these solutions. These results suggest that junctions between growth-arrested cells are permeated equally well and simultaneously by anions and cations, whereas junctions between proliferating cells are poorly permeated by large molecules of either charge and equally well but not simultaneously by small anions and cations. The data indicate that A7r5 cells regulate chemical coupling independent of electrical coupling, a capacity that could facilitate growth control while protecting vasomotor responsiveness of vessels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology
Volume275
Issue number6 44-6
StatePublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Gap Junctions
Vascular Smooth Muscle
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Muscle
Permeability
Tetraethylammonium
Cells
Cell growth
Anions
Cations
Glutamic Acid
Connexins
Growth
Rats
Coloring Agents
Molecules
Cell Cycle Resting Phase
Potassium Chloride
G1 Phase
Serum

Keywords

  • Cell cycle
  • Connexon
  • Growth control
  • Intercellular communication
  • Permselectivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Gap junction permeability is diminished in proliferating vascular smooth muscle cells. / Kurjiaka, David T.; Steele, Timothy D.; Olsen, Mary V.; Burt, Janis M.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology, Vol. 275, No. 6 44-6, 1998.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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