Gender and time of voting decision: Decision certainty during the 2000 presidential campaign

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Scholars and the media have long been concerned about gender gaps in the political sphere. This study examines gender differences in decision certainty across the 2000 general election campaign. Results suggest that during the 2000 general election campaign, women were more likely to say that they did not know for whom they intended to vote when asked about their voting intentions. Once their intentions were declared, they were no less likely than men to express certainty about their decisions. Consistent with prior studies, partisanship and party identification play substantive as well as statistically significant role in the certainty of a person's vote choice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-22
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Political Marketing
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 25 2007

Keywords

  • Decision certainty
  • Election 2000
  • Gender gap
  • Time of vote decision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Marketing

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