Gender, computer-assisted learning, and anxiety: With a little help from a friend

Joel Cooper, Jeffrey A Stone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the effects of learning group gender composition and the use of nonverbal communication by a computer on performance and motivation following a computer-assisted biology lesson. The results showed that before the lesson began, group gender composition influenced self-reports of experience and knowledge about computers and also how subjects arranged their computer desktop. During the lesson, when a computer image of a human face was present on the screen, girls who reported low anxiety performed better and were more motivated to use the program relative to girls who reported high anxiety. In contrast, boys who reported high anxiety performed better and were more motivated to use the program when the tutor was present on the screen relative to boys who reported low anxiety. The implications of these findings for classroom gender organization and for using gender-appropriate educational software are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-91
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Educational Computing Research
Volume15
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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anxiety
gender
learning
non-verbal communication
Chemical analysis
Personal computers
tutor
biology
Group
Communication
organization
classroom
performance
experience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Gender, computer-assisted learning, and anxiety : With a little help from a friend. / Cooper, Joel; Stone, Jeffrey A.

In: Journal of Educational Computing Research, Vol. 15, No. 1, 1996, p. 67-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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