Gender, Psychiatric Disability, and Dropout From Peer Support Specialist Training

James K. Cunningham, Jennifer Schultz De La Rosa, Cristian A. Quinones, Beverly A. McGuffin, Randa M. Kutob

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although research indicates that the prevalence of psychiatric disability differs depending on gender, a paucity of information exists as to whether men and women with psychiatric disability also differ regarding service program outcomes. For a United States Southwest peer support specialist training program, this study examines whether gender moderates the association between psychiatric disability and a key outcome- training dropout. Data were collected for 78 men and 157 women with psychiatric disability and 137 men and 203 women with mental illness only. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between psychiatric disability and dropout, with gender as a moderator variable, and age, education, race/ethnicity, and substance use disorder as control variables. Of trainees with psychiatric disability, dropout was greater among men than women (34.6% and 20.4%, respectively; p < .05). Dropout was also greater among men with psychiatric disability than among men with mental illness only (34.6% and 15.3%; p < .01). In contrast, dropout was similar for women with psychiatric disability and mental illness only (20.4% and 18.7%; p > .05), and dropout was comparable among men and women with mental illness only (15.3% and 18.7%; p > .05). In summary, risk of dropout was substantially higher among men with psychiatric disability than women with psychiatric disability. Gender tailoring of the program's services should be considered to better support training completion. This study's findings also raise questions as to possible underrepresentation of men with psychiatric disability in the peer support workforce training pipeline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychological Services
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Dropout
  • Gender
  • Peer support
  • Psychiatric disability
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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