General anesthetics directly inhibit electron mobility: dipole dispersion theory of anesthetic action.

S. R. Hameroff, R. C. Watt, J. D. Borel, G. Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

A model system of gaseous electron mobility, excitation, and plasma activity was used to study direct effects of six gases, including four general anesthetics, in oxygen. Helium increased, and nitrogen had minimal effects on gaseous excitation. Nitrous oxide, as well as the potent anesthetics halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane, inhibited gaseous excitation, nitrous oxide having the weakest anesthetic effect. The data are compatible with the view that anesthetic inhibition is mediated by Van der Waals dipole dispersion interactions among anesthetic molecules (e.g., halogenated hydrocarbons) and electrons accelerated by the applied field. Dipole dispersion interactions may also mediate anesthetic effects on synaptic protein conformational control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-187
Number of pages5
JournalPhysiological chemistry and physics
Volume14
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 1 1982

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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