Genetically modified rodent models: A new generation of translational cognitive science

Salvatore Oddo, Masashi Kitazawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The brain is the key organ that differentiates humans from each other and from other animals; it stores personal experiences and knowledge in the form of memories, integrates all external information, and controls fundamental functions for survival. The underlying molecular mechanisms of learning and memory, and maintaining such high plasticity and flexibility in the brain, have remained long-lasting mysteries in the field of neuroscience. This chapter primarily focuses on the role of neurons and signal transduction pathways within the neuronal cells in learning and memory, and details the procedures used for generating genetically modified rodents. Also discussed is the application of knockout and knock-in models to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms of learning and memory, as well as the advantages and limitations of their use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-283
Number of pages25
JournalNeuromethods
Volume94
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Keywords

  • Animal model
  • Behavior
  • Brain
  • Gene modify cation
  • Genetic
  • Knock-in
  • Knockout
  • Learning
  • Mutation
  • Pathology
  • Signal transduction
  • Transgenic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Genetically modified rodent models: A new generation of translational cognitive science'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this