Geographic inequity results in disparate mortality: A multivariate intent-to-treat analysis of liver transplant data

Abbas Rana, Irbaz Bin Riaz, Angelika C. Gruessner, Rainer W. Gruessner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Context: The distribution of livers to listed transplant candidates shows substantial geographic inequity. Objective: To compare mortality between the 11 UNOS (United Network of Organ Sharing) regions from the time of listing and to show that the geographic region impacts survival. Design, Setting, and Patients: We studied the data of 1930 adults listed with a Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score of 18 for a liver transplant from March 1, 2002 through December 31, 2007. We calculated one- and three-yr survival rates and performed multivariate Cox regression analysis to determine significant risk factors for mortality. Main Outcome Measures: Patient survival from the time of listing for transplantation. Results: Actual one-yr mortality rate from the time of listing ranged from 30.5% (Region 2) to 12.9% (Region 4). The three-yr mortality rate ranged from 42.0% (Region 2) to 21.6% (Region 4). Multivariate analysis showed a significant increase in mortality in Region 2 (odds ratio [OR], 1.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 1.83) and a significant decrease in mortality in Region 3 (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.93). Conclusions: We found significant differences in one- and three-yr mortality rates among UNOS regions. Regional disparities significantly affect patient survival and result in national inequality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)484-491
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Keywords

  • Geographic inequity
  • Intent-to-treat analysis
  • Liver transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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