Global warming and the hydrologic cycle

H. A. Loaiciga, Juan B Valdes, R. Vogel, J. Garvey, H. Schwarz

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

180 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines the current predictive capability of general circulation models linked with macroscale and landscape-scale hydrologic models that simulate regional and local hydrologic regimes under global warming scenarios. Issues concerning hydrologic model calibration and validation in the context of climate change are addressed. Greenhouse-warming scenarios in midlatitudinal basins of the United States, predict shorter winter seasons, larger winter floods, drier and more frequent summer weather, and overall enhanced and protracted hydrologic variability. All these predictions point to potentially worsening conditions for flood control, water storage, and water supply in areas of semiarid midlatitudinal climates currently dependent of spring snowmelt. Practice of sound water resources engineering principles ought to be adequate to cope with additional hydrologic uncertainty that might arise from global warming. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationJournal of Hydrology
Volume174
Edition1-2
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

hydrologic cycle
hydrologic models
global warming
General Circulation Models
winter
snowmelt
semiarid zones
flood control
water storage
water resources
water supply
general circulation model
engineering
calibration
uncertainty
weather
warming
water resource
climate change
basins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Soil Science
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

Loaiciga, H. A., Valdes, J. B., Vogel, R., Garvey, J., & Schwarz, H. (1996). Global warming and the hydrologic cycle. In Journal of Hydrology (1-2 ed., Vol. 174)

Global warming and the hydrologic cycle. / Loaiciga, H. A.; Valdes, Juan B; Vogel, R.; Garvey, J.; Schwarz, H.

Journal of Hydrology. Vol. 174 1-2. ed. 1996.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Loaiciga, HA, Valdes, JB, Vogel, R, Garvey, J & Schwarz, H 1996, Global warming and the hydrologic cycle. in Journal of Hydrology. 1-2 edn, vol. 174.
Loaiciga HA, Valdes JB, Vogel R, Garvey J, Schwarz H. Global warming and the hydrologic cycle. In Journal of Hydrology. 1-2 ed. Vol. 174. 1996
Loaiciga, H. A. ; Valdes, Juan B ; Vogel, R. ; Garvey, J. ; Schwarz, H. / Global warming and the hydrologic cycle. Journal of Hydrology. Vol. 174 1-2. ed. 1996.
@inbook{fa557ce00aa54e17bbe8c993e72a981c,
title = "Global warming and the hydrologic cycle",
abstract = "This paper examines the current predictive capability of general circulation models linked with macroscale and landscape-scale hydrologic models that simulate regional and local hydrologic regimes under global warming scenarios. Issues concerning hydrologic model calibration and validation in the context of climate change are addressed. Greenhouse-warming scenarios in midlatitudinal basins of the United States, predict shorter winter seasons, larger winter floods, drier and more frequent summer weather, and overall enhanced and protracted hydrologic variability. All these predictions point to potentially worsening conditions for flood control, water storage, and water supply in areas of semiarid midlatitudinal climates currently dependent of spring snowmelt. Practice of sound water resources engineering principles ought to be adequate to cope with additional hydrologic uncertainty that might arise from global warming. -from Authors",
author = "Loaiciga, {H. A.} and Valdes, {Juan B} and R. Vogel and J. Garvey and H. Schwarz",
year = "1996",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "174",
booktitle = "Journal of Hydrology",
edition = "1-2",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Global warming and the hydrologic cycle

AU - Loaiciga, H. A.

AU - Valdes, Juan B

AU - Vogel, R.

AU - Garvey, J.

AU - Schwarz, H.

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - This paper examines the current predictive capability of general circulation models linked with macroscale and landscape-scale hydrologic models that simulate regional and local hydrologic regimes under global warming scenarios. Issues concerning hydrologic model calibration and validation in the context of climate change are addressed. Greenhouse-warming scenarios in midlatitudinal basins of the United States, predict shorter winter seasons, larger winter floods, drier and more frequent summer weather, and overall enhanced and protracted hydrologic variability. All these predictions point to potentially worsening conditions for flood control, water storage, and water supply in areas of semiarid midlatitudinal climates currently dependent of spring snowmelt. Practice of sound water resources engineering principles ought to be adequate to cope with additional hydrologic uncertainty that might arise from global warming. -from Authors

AB - This paper examines the current predictive capability of general circulation models linked with macroscale and landscape-scale hydrologic models that simulate regional and local hydrologic regimes under global warming scenarios. Issues concerning hydrologic model calibration and validation in the context of climate change are addressed. Greenhouse-warming scenarios in midlatitudinal basins of the United States, predict shorter winter seasons, larger winter floods, drier and more frequent summer weather, and overall enhanced and protracted hydrologic variability. All these predictions point to potentially worsening conditions for flood control, water storage, and water supply in areas of semiarid midlatitudinal climates currently dependent of spring snowmelt. Practice of sound water resources engineering principles ought to be adequate to cope with additional hydrologic uncertainty that might arise from global warming. -from Authors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029669129&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029669129&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:0029669129

VL - 174

BT - Journal of Hydrology

ER -