Glomerular filtration rate in conscious unrestrained starlings under dehydration

J. R. Roberts, William H Dantzler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was measured in conscious unrestrained starlings, Sturnis vulgaris. Alzet osmotic minipumps were inserted into the peritoneal cavity under lidocaine local anesthesia and served to infuse the GFR marker [14C]sodium ferrocyanide. GFR was measured in hydrated birds and again after a 24-h period of water deprivation. GFR in dehydrated birds was 1.15 ± 0.09 ml · min-1 · kg-1, significantly lower (P < 0.001) than the 2.71 ± 0.31 ml · min-1 · kg-1 in fully hydrated animals. In addition, the GFR on the hydrated birds was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than values of 4.43 ± 0.24 ml · min-1 · kg-1 measured in hydrated anesthetized birds during micropuncture studies. A 24-h period of water deprivation caused significant increases in plasma osmolality and concentration of sodium, chloride, and phosphate. The osmolality and concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and phosphate were significantly elevated in both cloacal urine supernatant and in ureteral urine of dehydrated birds. In both hydrated and dehydrated states, the concentration of magnesium, phosphate, potassium, and total osmolality were significantly higher in cloacal urine than in ureteral urine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume256
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1989

Fingerprint

Starlings
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Dehydration
Birds
Urine
Osmolar Concentration
Water Deprivation
Peritoneal Cavity
Local Anesthesia
Lidocaine
Punctures
Sodium Chloride
Potassium
Sodium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

@article{ae2cc41f6e0042be9fa7ee1fd67dc40c,
title = "Glomerular filtration rate in conscious unrestrained starlings under dehydration",
abstract = "Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was measured in conscious unrestrained starlings, Sturnis vulgaris. Alzet osmotic minipumps were inserted into the peritoneal cavity under lidocaine local anesthesia and served to infuse the GFR marker [14C]sodium ferrocyanide. GFR was measured in hydrated birds and again after a 24-h period of water deprivation. GFR in dehydrated birds was 1.15 ± 0.09 ml · min-1 · kg-1, significantly lower (P < 0.001) than the 2.71 ± 0.31 ml · min-1 · kg-1 in fully hydrated animals. In addition, the GFR on the hydrated birds was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than values of 4.43 ± 0.24 ml · min-1 · kg-1 measured in hydrated anesthetized birds during micropuncture studies. A 24-h period of water deprivation caused significant increases in plasma osmolality and concentration of sodium, chloride, and phosphate. The osmolality and concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and phosphate were significantly elevated in both cloacal urine supernatant and in ureteral urine of dehydrated birds. In both hydrated and dehydrated states, the concentration of magnesium, phosphate, potassium, and total osmolality were significantly higher in cloacal urine than in ureteral urine.",
author = "Roberts, {J. R.} and Dantzler, {William H}",
year = "1989",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "256",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology",
issn = "0363-6143",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Glomerular filtration rate in conscious unrestrained starlings under dehydration

AU - Roberts, J. R.

AU - Dantzler, William H

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was measured in conscious unrestrained starlings, Sturnis vulgaris. Alzet osmotic minipumps were inserted into the peritoneal cavity under lidocaine local anesthesia and served to infuse the GFR marker [14C]sodium ferrocyanide. GFR was measured in hydrated birds and again after a 24-h period of water deprivation. GFR in dehydrated birds was 1.15 ± 0.09 ml · min-1 · kg-1, significantly lower (P < 0.001) than the 2.71 ± 0.31 ml · min-1 · kg-1 in fully hydrated animals. In addition, the GFR on the hydrated birds was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than values of 4.43 ± 0.24 ml · min-1 · kg-1 measured in hydrated anesthetized birds during micropuncture studies. A 24-h period of water deprivation caused significant increases in plasma osmolality and concentration of sodium, chloride, and phosphate. The osmolality and concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and phosphate were significantly elevated in both cloacal urine supernatant and in ureteral urine of dehydrated birds. In both hydrated and dehydrated states, the concentration of magnesium, phosphate, potassium, and total osmolality were significantly higher in cloacal urine than in ureteral urine.

AB - Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was measured in conscious unrestrained starlings, Sturnis vulgaris. Alzet osmotic minipumps were inserted into the peritoneal cavity under lidocaine local anesthesia and served to infuse the GFR marker [14C]sodium ferrocyanide. GFR was measured in hydrated birds and again after a 24-h period of water deprivation. GFR in dehydrated birds was 1.15 ± 0.09 ml · min-1 · kg-1, significantly lower (P < 0.001) than the 2.71 ± 0.31 ml · min-1 · kg-1 in fully hydrated animals. In addition, the GFR on the hydrated birds was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than values of 4.43 ± 0.24 ml · min-1 · kg-1 measured in hydrated anesthetized birds during micropuncture studies. A 24-h period of water deprivation caused significant increases in plasma osmolality and concentration of sodium, chloride, and phosphate. The osmolality and concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and phosphate were significantly elevated in both cloacal urine supernatant and in ureteral urine of dehydrated birds. In both hydrated and dehydrated states, the concentration of magnesium, phosphate, potassium, and total osmolality were significantly higher in cloacal urine than in ureteral urine.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024595118&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024595118&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 2705574

AN - SCOPUS:0024595118

VL - 256

JO - American Journal of Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology

SN - 0363-6143

IS - 4

ER -