Ground-based inhibition: Suppressive perceptual mechanisms interact with top-down attention to reduce distractor interference

Erica Wager, Mary A Peterson, Jonathan R. Folstein, Paige E. Scalf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Successful attentional function requires inhibition of distracting information (e.g., Deutsch & Deutsch, 1963). Similarly, perceptual segregation of the visual world into figure and ground entails ground suppression (e.g., Likova & Tyler, 2008; Peterson & Skow, 2008). Here, we ask whether the suppressive processes of attention and perception-distractor inhibition and ground suppression-interact to more effectively insulate task performance from interfering information. We used a variant of the Eriksen flanker paradigm to assess the efficacy of distractor inhibition. Participants indicated the right/left orientation of a central arrow, which could be flanked by congruent, neutral, or incongruent stimuli. We manipulated the degree to which the ground region of a display was suppressed and measured the influence of this manipulation on the efficacy with which participants could inhibit responses from incongruent flankers. Greater ground suppression reduced the influence on target identification of interfering, incongruent information, but not that of facilitative, congruent information. These data are the first to show that distractor inhibition interacts with ground suppression to improve attentional function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9
JournalJournal of Vision
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Task Performance and Analysis
Inhibition (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Distractor inhibition
  • Figure-ground segregation
  • Ground suppression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Ground-based inhibition : Suppressive perceptual mechanisms interact with top-down attention to reduce distractor interference. / Wager, Erica; Peterson, Mary A; Folstein, Jonathan R.; Scalf, Paige E.

In: Journal of Vision, Vol. 15, No. 8, 9, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{de64c49259664ce8a0ac837517e6f578,
title = "Ground-based inhibition: Suppressive perceptual mechanisms interact with top-down attention to reduce distractor interference",
abstract = "Successful attentional function requires inhibition of distracting information (e.g., Deutsch & Deutsch, 1963). Similarly, perceptual segregation of the visual world into figure and ground entails ground suppression (e.g., Likova & Tyler, 2008; Peterson & Skow, 2008). Here, we ask whether the suppressive processes of attention and perception-distractor inhibition and ground suppression-interact to more effectively insulate task performance from interfering information. We used a variant of the Eriksen flanker paradigm to assess the efficacy of distractor inhibition. Participants indicated the right/left orientation of a central arrow, which could be flanked by congruent, neutral, or incongruent stimuli. We manipulated the degree to which the ground region of a display was suppressed and measured the influence of this manipulation on the efficacy with which participants could inhibit responses from incongruent flankers. Greater ground suppression reduced the influence on target identification of interfering, incongruent information, but not that of facilitative, congruent information. These data are the first to show that distractor inhibition interacts with ground suppression to improve attentional function.",
keywords = "Attention, Distractor inhibition, Figure-ground segregation, Ground suppression",
author = "Erica Wager and Peterson, {Mary A} and Folstein, {Jonathan R.} and Scalf, {Paige E.}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1167/15.8.9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
journal = "Journal of Vision",
issn = "1534-7362",
publisher = "Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ground-based inhibition

T2 - Suppressive perceptual mechanisms interact with top-down attention to reduce distractor interference

AU - Wager, Erica

AU - Peterson, Mary A

AU - Folstein, Jonathan R.

AU - Scalf, Paige E.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Successful attentional function requires inhibition of distracting information (e.g., Deutsch & Deutsch, 1963). Similarly, perceptual segregation of the visual world into figure and ground entails ground suppression (e.g., Likova & Tyler, 2008; Peterson & Skow, 2008). Here, we ask whether the suppressive processes of attention and perception-distractor inhibition and ground suppression-interact to more effectively insulate task performance from interfering information. We used a variant of the Eriksen flanker paradigm to assess the efficacy of distractor inhibition. Participants indicated the right/left orientation of a central arrow, which could be flanked by congruent, neutral, or incongruent stimuli. We manipulated the degree to which the ground region of a display was suppressed and measured the influence of this manipulation on the efficacy with which participants could inhibit responses from incongruent flankers. Greater ground suppression reduced the influence on target identification of interfering, incongruent information, but not that of facilitative, congruent information. These data are the first to show that distractor inhibition interacts with ground suppression to improve attentional function.

AB - Successful attentional function requires inhibition of distracting information (e.g., Deutsch & Deutsch, 1963). Similarly, perceptual segregation of the visual world into figure and ground entails ground suppression (e.g., Likova & Tyler, 2008; Peterson & Skow, 2008). Here, we ask whether the suppressive processes of attention and perception-distractor inhibition and ground suppression-interact to more effectively insulate task performance from interfering information. We used a variant of the Eriksen flanker paradigm to assess the efficacy of distractor inhibition. Participants indicated the right/left orientation of a central arrow, which could be flanked by congruent, neutral, or incongruent stimuli. We manipulated the degree to which the ground region of a display was suppressed and measured the influence of this manipulation on the efficacy with which participants could inhibit responses from incongruent flankers. Greater ground suppression reduced the influence on target identification of interfering, incongruent information, but not that of facilitative, congruent information. These data are the first to show that distractor inhibition interacts with ground suppression to improve attentional function.

KW - Attention

KW - Distractor inhibition

KW - Figure-ground segregation

KW - Ground suppression

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84935493808&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84935493808&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1167/15.8.9

DO - 10.1167/15.8.9

M3 - Article

C2 - 26114672

AN - SCOPUS:84935493808

VL - 15

JO - Journal of Vision

JF - Journal of Vision

SN - 1534-7362

IS - 8

M1 - 9

ER -