Groundwater capture processes under a seasonal variation in natural recharge and discharge

Thomas Maddock, Leticia Beatrix Vionnet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

"Capture" is the increase in recharge and the decrease in discharge that occurs when pumping is imposed on an aquifer system that was in a previous state of approximate dynamic equilibrium. Regional groundwater models are usually used to calculate capture in a two-step procedure. A steady-state solution provides an initial-head configuration, a set of flows through the boundaries for the modeled region, and the initial basis for the capture calculation. The transient solutions provide the total change in flows through the boundaries. A difference between the transient and steady-state solutions renders the capture calculation. When seasonality is a modeling issue, the use of a single initial hydraulic head and a single set of boundary flows leads to miscalculations of capture. Instead, an initial condition for each season should be used. This approach may be accomplished by determining steady oscillatory solutions, which vary through the seasons but repeat from year to year. A regional groundwater model previously developed for a portion of the San Pedro River basin, Arizona, USA, is modified to illustrate the effect that different initial conditions have on transient solutions and on capture calculations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-32
Number of pages9
JournalHydrogeology Journal
Volume6
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1998

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recharge
seasonal variation
groundwater
hydraulic head
seasonality
pumping
river basin
aquifer
modeling
calculation
effect

Keywords

  • Groundwater development
  • Groundwater/surface-water relations
  • Numerical modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Groundwater capture processes under a seasonal variation in natural recharge and discharge. / Maddock, Thomas; Vionnet, Leticia Beatrix.

In: Hydrogeology Journal, Vol. 6, No. 1, 1998, p. 24-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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