Guidelines for conducting mixed-methods research

An extension and illustration

Viswanath Venkatesh, Susan A Brown, Yulia W. Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we extend the guidelines of Venkatesh et al. (2013) for mixed-methods research by identifying and integrating variations in mixed-methods research. By considering 14 properties of mixed-methods research (e.g., purposes, research questions, epistemological assumptions), our guidelines demonstrate how researchers can flexibly identify the existing variations in mixed-methods research and proceed accordingly with a study design that suits their needs. To make the guidelines actionable for various situations and issues that researchers could encounter, we develop a decision tree to map the flow and relationship among the design strategies. We also illustrate one possible type of mixed-methods research in information systems in depth and discuss how to develop and validate meta-inferences as the outcomes of such a study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)435-495
Number of pages61
JournalJournal of the Association of Information Systems
Volume17
Issue number7
StatePublished - 2016

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Decision trees
Information systems

Keywords

  • Meta-inferences
  • Mixed-methods Research
  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative
  • Research Design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Guidelines for conducting mixed-methods research : An extension and illustration. / Venkatesh, Viswanath; Brown, Susan A; Sullivan, Yulia W.

In: Journal of the Association of Information Systems, Vol. 17, No. 7, 2016, p. 435-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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