Gyral morphology in the posterior Sylvian region in families affected by developmental language disorder

Teresa Jackson, Elena Plante

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study describes the family aggregation of gyral morphology in the posterior perisylvian region in families that contain one or more children with a developmental language disorder. The probands in these families were 8 male and 2 female children referred through therapy programs and schools for children with language and reading problems. Family members included both biological parents (10 m, 10 f) and all available siblings (6 m, 4 f). Gyral morphology in the members of these families was compared with control subjects (10 m, 10 f) who were without a personal or family history of developmental language disorders. Gyral morphology was evaluated using T1-weighted sagittal scans from a GE Signa 1.5T magnet, 5 mm consecutive slices through the full brain volume. A less common type of Sylvian fissure morphology was more frequently found in the hemispheres of language-disordered subjects and their first-degree relatives than in control subjects. In addition, the pattern of Sylvian fissure morphology across generations within the families suggests that this feature might be inherited from either parent. The elevated rate of extra gyri in the posterior perisylvian region in families affected by language disorder links an anomaly within a language-related brain region with familial risk for this disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-94
Number of pages14
JournalNeuropsychology Review
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996

Keywords

  • Adults
  • Brain morphology
  • Children
  • Dyslexia
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Specific language impairment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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