Hallux valgus surgery may produce early improvements in balance control: Results of a cross-sectional pilot study

Saba Sadra, Adam Fleischer, Erin Klein, Gurtej S. Grewal, Jessica Knight, Lowell Scott Weil, Lowell Weil, Bijan Najafi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hallux valgus (HV) is associated with poorer performance during gait and balance tasks and is an independent risk factor for falls in older adults. We sought to assess whether corrective HV surgery improves gait and balance. Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, gait and static balance data were obtained from 40 adults: 19 patients with HV only (preoperative group), 10 patients who recently underwent successful HV surgery (postoperative group), and 11 control participants. Assessments were made in the clinic using body-worn sensors. Results: Patients in the preoperative group generally demonstrated poorer static balance control compared with the other two groups. Despite similar age and body mass index, postoperative patients exhibited 29% and 63% less center of mass sway than preoperative patients during double-and single-support balance assessments, respectively (analysis of variance P =.17 and P =.14, respectively [both eyes open condition]). Overall, gait performance was similar among the groups, except for speed during gait initiation, where lower speeds were encountered in the postoperative group compared with the preoperative group (Scheffe P =.049). Conclusions: This study provides supportive evidence regarding the benefits of corrective lower-extremity surgery on certain aspects of balance control. Patients seem to demonstrate early improvements in static balance after corrective HV surgery, whereas gait improvements may require a longer recovery time. Further research using a longitudinal study design and a larger sample size capable of assessing the long-term effects of HV surgical correction on balance and gait is probably warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-497
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Podiatric Medical Association
Volume103
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 2013

Fingerprint

Hallux Valgus
Gait
Cross-Sectional Studies
Sample Size
Longitudinal Studies
Lower Extremity
Analysis of Variance
Body Mass Index
Control Groups
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Podiatry

Cite this

Hallux valgus surgery may produce early improvements in balance control : Results of a cross-sectional pilot study. / Sadra, Saba; Fleischer, Adam; Klein, Erin; Grewal, Gurtej S.; Knight, Jessica; Weil, Lowell Scott; Weil, Lowell; Najafi, Bijan.

In: Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, Vol. 103, No. 6, 11.2013, p. 489-497.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sadra, Saba ; Fleischer, Adam ; Klein, Erin ; Grewal, Gurtej S. ; Knight, Jessica ; Weil, Lowell Scott ; Weil, Lowell ; Najafi, Bijan. / Hallux valgus surgery may produce early improvements in balance control : Results of a cross-sectional pilot study. In: Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association. 2013 ; Vol. 103, No. 6. pp. 489-497.
@article{1a2bde2ee98d416f952982c32ebf8df2,
title = "Hallux valgus surgery may produce early improvements in balance control: Results of a cross-sectional pilot study",
abstract = "Background: Hallux valgus (HV) is associated with poorer performance during gait and balance tasks and is an independent risk factor for falls in older adults. We sought to assess whether corrective HV surgery improves gait and balance. Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, gait and static balance data were obtained from 40 adults: 19 patients with HV only (preoperative group), 10 patients who recently underwent successful HV surgery (postoperative group), and 11 control participants. Assessments were made in the clinic using body-worn sensors. Results: Patients in the preoperative group generally demonstrated poorer static balance control compared with the other two groups. Despite similar age and body mass index, postoperative patients exhibited 29{\%} and 63{\%} less center of mass sway than preoperative patients during double-and single-support balance assessments, respectively (analysis of variance P =.17 and P =.14, respectively [both eyes open condition]). Overall, gait performance was similar among the groups, except for speed during gait initiation, where lower speeds were encountered in the postoperative group compared with the preoperative group (Scheffe P =.049). Conclusions: This study provides supportive evidence regarding the benefits of corrective lower-extremity surgery on certain aspects of balance control. Patients seem to demonstrate early improvements in static balance after corrective HV surgery, whereas gait improvements may require a longer recovery time. Further research using a longitudinal study design and a larger sample size capable of assessing the long-term effects of HV surgical correction on balance and gait is probably warranted.",
author = "Saba Sadra and Adam Fleischer and Erin Klein and Grewal, {Gurtej S.} and Jessica Knight and Weil, {Lowell Scott} and Lowell Weil and Bijan Najafi",
year = "2013",
month = "11",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "103",
pages = "489--497",
journal = "Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association",
issn = "8750-7315",
publisher = "American Podiatric Medical Association",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hallux valgus surgery may produce early improvements in balance control

T2 - Results of a cross-sectional pilot study

AU - Sadra, Saba

AU - Fleischer, Adam

AU - Klein, Erin

AU - Grewal, Gurtej S.

AU - Knight, Jessica

AU - Weil, Lowell Scott

AU - Weil, Lowell

AU - Najafi, Bijan

PY - 2013/11

Y1 - 2013/11

N2 - Background: Hallux valgus (HV) is associated with poorer performance during gait and balance tasks and is an independent risk factor for falls in older adults. We sought to assess whether corrective HV surgery improves gait and balance. Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, gait and static balance data were obtained from 40 adults: 19 patients with HV only (preoperative group), 10 patients who recently underwent successful HV surgery (postoperative group), and 11 control participants. Assessments were made in the clinic using body-worn sensors. Results: Patients in the preoperative group generally demonstrated poorer static balance control compared with the other two groups. Despite similar age and body mass index, postoperative patients exhibited 29% and 63% less center of mass sway than preoperative patients during double-and single-support balance assessments, respectively (analysis of variance P =.17 and P =.14, respectively [both eyes open condition]). Overall, gait performance was similar among the groups, except for speed during gait initiation, where lower speeds were encountered in the postoperative group compared with the preoperative group (Scheffe P =.049). Conclusions: This study provides supportive evidence regarding the benefits of corrective lower-extremity surgery on certain aspects of balance control. Patients seem to demonstrate early improvements in static balance after corrective HV surgery, whereas gait improvements may require a longer recovery time. Further research using a longitudinal study design and a larger sample size capable of assessing the long-term effects of HV surgical correction on balance and gait is probably warranted.

AB - Background: Hallux valgus (HV) is associated with poorer performance during gait and balance tasks and is an independent risk factor for falls in older adults. We sought to assess whether corrective HV surgery improves gait and balance. Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, gait and static balance data were obtained from 40 adults: 19 patients with HV only (preoperative group), 10 patients who recently underwent successful HV surgery (postoperative group), and 11 control participants. Assessments were made in the clinic using body-worn sensors. Results: Patients in the preoperative group generally demonstrated poorer static balance control compared with the other two groups. Despite similar age and body mass index, postoperative patients exhibited 29% and 63% less center of mass sway than preoperative patients during double-and single-support balance assessments, respectively (analysis of variance P =.17 and P =.14, respectively [both eyes open condition]). Overall, gait performance was similar among the groups, except for speed during gait initiation, where lower speeds were encountered in the postoperative group compared with the preoperative group (Scheffe P =.049). Conclusions: This study provides supportive evidence regarding the benefits of corrective lower-extremity surgery on certain aspects of balance control. Patients seem to demonstrate early improvements in static balance after corrective HV surgery, whereas gait improvements may require a longer recovery time. Further research using a longitudinal study design and a larger sample size capable of assessing the long-term effects of HV surgical correction on balance and gait is probably warranted.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84889032486&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84889032486&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 24297985

AN - SCOPUS:84889032486

VL - 103

SP - 489

EP - 497

JO - Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association

JF - Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association

SN - 8750-7315

IS - 6

ER -