Hand infections: A retrospective analysis

Tolga Turker, Nicole Capdarest-Arest, Spencer T. Bertoch, Erik C. Bakken, Susan E. Hoover, Jiyao Zou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose. Hand infections are common, usually resulting froman untreated injury. In this retrospective study, we report on hand infection cases needing surgical drainage in order to assess patient demographics, causation of infection, clinical course, and clinical management. Methods. Medical records of patients presenting with hand infections, excluding post-surgical infections, treated with incision and debridement over a one-year period were reviewed. Patient demographics; past medical history; infection site(s) and causation; intervals between onset of infection, hospital admission, surgical intervention and days of hospitalization; gram stains and cultures; choice of antibiotics; complications; and outcomes were reviewed. Results. Most infections were caused by laceration and the most common site of infection was the palm or dorsum of the hand. Mean length of hospitalization was 6 days. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, beta-hemolytic Streptococcus and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus were the most commonly cultured microorganisms. Cephalosporins, clindamycin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, penicillin, vancomycin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole were major antibiotic choices. Amputations and contracture were the primary complications. Conclusions. Surgery along with medical management were key to treatment and most soft tissue infections resolved without further complications. With prompt and appropriate care, most hand infection patients can achieve full resolution of their infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere513
JournalPeerJ
Volume2014
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Antibiotics
  • Hand
  • Incision-drainage
  • Infection
  • Intravenous drug usage
  • Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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    Turker, T., Capdarest-Arest, N., Bertoch, S. T., Bakken, E. C., Hoover, S. E., & Zou, J. (2014). Hand infections: A retrospective analysis. PeerJ, 2014(1), [e513]. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.513