Have CD19-directed immunotherapy and haploidentical hematopoietic cell transplantation transformed pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia into a chronic disease?

Holly Pariury, Laurel Truscott, Emmanuel Katsanis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The treatment of pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) has undergone several recent advancements, leading to an increased amount of treatment options for relapsed patients. The development of immunotherapies such as anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor(CAR) T cells and bispecific T-cell engagers has given clinicians therapeutic options with less expected toxicity when compared to standard re-induction chemotherapy. This is especially beneficial in patients with toxicities from their prior treatment. Along with this, the emergence of haploidentical hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has increased opportunity for patients to receive HCT who may not have had an available matched donor. We present four patients who have received all of these therapies in different combinations to treat multiple relapses. Because of the success of achieving remission as well as decreasing toxicity, the patients are alive and well up to 15 y after the original B-ALL diagnosis, rendering this as a chronic disease for them.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1956125
JournalOncoImmunology
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

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