Having to wait for service

Customer reactions to delays in service delivery

Markus Groth, Stephen W Gilliland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two experiments tested the effects of providing wait duration information and explanations for the reason for a delay on customer reactions to a delayed service delivery. In Study 1, 111 participants read a paper-and-pencil scenario about a wait for service at a doctor's office. In Study 2, 87 participants experienced an actual delay at a research facility. In both studies, participants were subsequently surveyed about their service evaluation and reactions to the delay. Results indicate that providing a provider-not-at-fault explanation led to the most positive customer reactions, whereas providing no explanation led to more positive reactions than a provider-at-fault explanation. Providing waiting duration estimates had only limited effects on customers' reactions. Results are discussed from the perspective of wait time theories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-129
Number of pages23
JournalApplied Psychology
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006

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Research
Customer Service
Service Delivery
Fault
Evaluation
Scenarios
Pencil
Doctors
Experiment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Having to wait for service : Customer reactions to delays in service delivery. / Groth, Markus; Gilliland, Stephen W.

In: Applied Psychology, Vol. 55, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 107-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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