"He was framed!" Framing criminal behavior in sports news

Anita Atwell Seate, James T Harwood, Erin Blecha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An experiment examined the effects of newspaper articles about an athlete involved in a crime on perceptions of athletes. News articles were varied by framing the athlete's activities in an accusatory versus defensive manner, and framing the athlete as physically versus mentally skilled. An accusatory frame resulted in more criminally culpable perceptions of the athlete. Frame did not influence perceptions of the athlete's race, and perceptions of the athlete as Black did not increase perceived culpability. Additional findings show that framing does influence more general perceptions of athletes. Discussion focuses on media framing, attitudes toward athletes, and college students' socially desirable responses concerning race.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-354
Number of pages12
JournalCommunication Research Reports
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

Fingerprint

sports news
criminality
Crime
athlete
Sports
Students
Experiments
newspaper
news

Keywords

  • Athletes in the Media
  • Framing
  • Media Effects
  • Race
  • Stereotyping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Cite this

"He was framed!" Framing criminal behavior in sports news. / Seate, Anita Atwell; Harwood, James T; Blecha, Erin.

In: Communication Research Reports, Vol. 27, No. 4, 10.2010, p. 343-354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seate, Anita Atwell ; Harwood, James T ; Blecha, Erin. / "He was framed!" Framing criminal behavior in sports news. In: Communication Research Reports. 2010 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 343-354.
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