Health-related risk behaviors among myocardial infarction survivors in the United States: A propensity score matched study

Zufan Yegezu, Lea Mollon, Dhafer Mahdi Alshayban, Jawad Bilal, Sandipan Bhattacharjee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: According to the American College of Cardiology/the American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) recommendations, health-related risk behaviors for secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI) are critical to determine. Objective: This study aimed to compare health-related risk behaviors between MI survivors and propensity-score-matched non-MI controls using nationally representative data. Methods: This cross-sectional, matched case-control study used publicly available Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) 2017 data. Older adults with MI were propensity-score-matched to their non-MI controls. The 10 dependent variables included body mass index (BMI), smoking status, heavy alcohol consumption, influenza vaccine, length of time since last routine and cholesterol checkup, alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable consumption, and physical activity. Chi-square tests and binomial logistic regression were used to examine the health-related risk behaviors differences between MI survivors and propensity-score-matched non-MI controls. Results: The final study sample consisted of 18,021 MI survivors and 54,063 non-MI controls after propensity score matching. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed significant differences between MI survivors and matched non-MI controls in terms of cholesterol checkup, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. For example, multivariate analysis of health-related risk behaviors showed MI survivors were more likely to be smokers (AOR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.28–1.68). Conclusion: Based on this national survey of adults, MI survivors were more likely to be smokers but less likely to consume alcohol compared to their propensity-score-matched controls. Moreover, MI survivors were more likely to have their cholesterol checkup within the past 2 years compared to matched non-MI controls. Although lower alcohol consumption and greater chances of cholesterol checkups are reassuring health-related behaviors, interventions are needed to minimize the chances of smoking in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalResearch in Social and Administrative Pharmacy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Health-related risk behaviors
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Propensity score matching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmaceutical Science

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