Hearing conservation in high risk industries: Compliance with, and barriers to best practice in, workplace noise control

David McBride, Melanie Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The last omnibus report on noise in New Zealand workplaces was carried out in 1984 when 15,957 workers in high noise-risk areas showed 6,493 (40%) were actually exposed above the exposure standard of 85 dB(A) and of the 3,700 (23%) who had audiometric screening, 15% had evidence (a loss at 4 kHz of 35 dB hearing at age 25 or 50 or more at any age) of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL).1 A recent review showed that the numbers of new claims incurring a cost to ACC in 2005-6 (5,580 cases) were approximately double the figure in 1995-1996 (2,823), and the costs of NIHL have been estimated as NZ$198.32 million since 1995.2 Despite knowledge of effective controls since the mid-80s, there is no evidence that the prevalence of the condition is decreasing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-215
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Health, Safety and Environment
Volume27
Issue number3
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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