Heart rate variability as a proxy for fetal programming: The effect of maternal exercise

Kathleen M. Gustafson, Linda E. May, John JB Allen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Our research aim was twofold; a) to determine if maternal physical activity during pregnancy would influence the development of fetal cardiac autonomic control and b) whether HRV could serve as a sensitive indicator of fetal programming effects. Pregnant women with singleton pregnancies participated in a longitudinal study. Magnetocardiograms (MCG) were recorded during pregnancy and when infants reached 1 month of age. Metrics of heart rate (HR) and variability (HRV) were calculated from the R-R intervals. Fetal HR was lower and HRV higher in the Exercise group and this effect persisted into the infant period. We conclude that maternal physical activity can influence the development of fetal cardiac autonomic control and this may give offspring an adaptive advantage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2014 8th Conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, ESGCO 2014
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages33-34
Number of pages2
ISBN (Print)9781479939695
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Event2014 8th Conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, ESGCO 2014 - Trento, Italy
Duration: May 25 2014May 28 2014

Other

Other2014 8th Conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, ESGCO 2014
CountryItaly
CityTrento
Period5/25/145/28/14

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Gustafson, K. M., May, L. E., & Allen, J. JB. (2014). Heart rate variability as a proxy for fetal programming: The effect of maternal exercise. In 2014 8th Conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, ESGCO 2014 (pp. 33-34). [6847505] IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/ESGCO.2014.6847505

Heart rate variability as a proxy for fetal programming : The effect of maternal exercise. / Gustafson, Kathleen M.; May, Linda E.; Allen, John JB.

2014 8th Conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, ESGCO 2014. IEEE Computer Society, 2014. p. 33-34 6847505.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Gustafson, KM, May, LE & Allen, JJB 2014, Heart rate variability as a proxy for fetal programming: The effect of maternal exercise. in 2014 8th Conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, ESGCO 2014., 6847505, IEEE Computer Society, pp. 33-34, 2014 8th Conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, ESGCO 2014, Trento, Italy, 5/25/14. https://doi.org/10.1109/ESGCO.2014.6847505
Gustafson KM, May LE, Allen JJB. Heart rate variability as a proxy for fetal programming: The effect of maternal exercise. In 2014 8th Conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, ESGCO 2014. IEEE Computer Society. 2014. p. 33-34. 6847505 https://doi.org/10.1109/ESGCO.2014.6847505
Gustafson, Kathleen M. ; May, Linda E. ; Allen, John JB. / Heart rate variability as a proxy for fetal programming : The effect of maternal exercise. 2014 8th Conference of the European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, ESGCO 2014. IEEE Computer Society, 2014. pp. 33-34
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