Heat fatalities in Pima county, Arizona

Samuel M Keim, Mary Z. Mays, Bruce Parks, Erik Pytlak, Robin B Harris, Michael A. Kent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The most common cause of heat fatalities is environmental exposure during heat waves. Deserts of the southwestern USA are known for temperatures that exceed 32 °C for 30 days or more; yet, heat-related fatalities are rare among residents of the region. We compiled data from the National Weather Service and the Office of the Medical Examiner in order to determine the relationship between temperature and occurrence of heat fatalities in Pima County, AZ. Logistic regression indicated that for each degree of increase in temperature (°C), there was a 35% increase in the odds of a heat fatality occurring (p < 0.001).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)288-292
Number of pages5
JournalHealth and Place
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

Fingerprint

Potassium Iodide
heat
Hot Temperature
Temperature
temperature
Infrared Rays
Coroners and Medical Examiners
logistics
Environmental Exposure
Weather
desert
medical examiner
weather
Logistic Models
county
resident
regression
cause

Keywords

  • Environmental health
  • Heat
  • Heat fatality
  • Heatstroke
  • Immigration
  • Logistic regression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Development
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Heat fatalities in Pima county, Arizona. / Keim, Samuel M; Mays, Mary Z.; Parks, Bruce; Pytlak, Erik; Harris, Robin B; Kent, Michael A.

In: Health and Place, Vol. 13, No. 1, 03.2007, p. 288-292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Keim, SM, Mays, MZ, Parks, B, Pytlak, E, Harris, RB & Kent, MA 2007, 'Heat fatalities in Pima county, Arizona', Health and Place, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 288-292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2005.08.004
Keim, Samuel M ; Mays, Mary Z. ; Parks, Bruce ; Pytlak, Erik ; Harris, Robin B ; Kent, Michael A. / Heat fatalities in Pima county, Arizona. In: Health and Place. 2007 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 288-292.
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