Heat generates oxidized linoleic acid metabolites that activate TRPV1 and produce pain in rodents

Amol M Patwardhan, Armen N. Akopian, Nikita B. Ruparel, Anibal Diogenes, Susan T. Weintraub, Charis Uhlson, Robert C. Murphy, Kenneth M. Hargreaves

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

149 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is the principal detector of noxious heat in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 is expressed in many nociceptors and is involved in heat-induced hyperalgesia and thermoregulation. The precise mechanism or mechanisms mediating the thermal sensitivity of TRPV1 are unknown. Here, we have shown that the oxidized linoleic acid metabolites 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9- and 13-HODE) are formed in mouse and rat skin biopsies by exposure to noxious heat. 9- and 13-HODE and their metabolites, 9- and 13-oxoODE, activated TRPV1 and therefore constitute a family of endogenous TRPV1 agonists. Moreover, blocking these substances substantially decreased the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rats and mice and reduced nociception. Collectively, our results indicate that HODEs contribute to the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rodents. Because oxidized linoleic acid metabolites are released during cell injury, these findings suggest a mechanism for integrating the hyperalgesic and proinflammatory roles of TRPV1 and linoleic acid metabolites and may provide the foundation for investigating new classes of analgesic drugs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1617-1626
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume120
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 3 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Linoleic Acid
Rodentia
Hot Temperature
Pain
Nociceptors
Nociception
vanilloid receptor subtype 1
Body Temperature Regulation
Hyperalgesia
Peripheral Nervous System
Analgesics
Biopsy
Skin
Wounds and Injuries
13-hydroxy-9,11-octadecadienoic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Patwardhan, A. M., Akopian, A. N., Ruparel, N. B., Diogenes, A., Weintraub, S. T., Uhlson, C., ... Hargreaves, K. M. (2010). Heat generates oxidized linoleic acid metabolites that activate TRPV1 and produce pain in rodents. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 120(5), 1617-1626. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI41678

Heat generates oxidized linoleic acid metabolites that activate TRPV1 and produce pain in rodents. / Patwardhan, Amol M; Akopian, Armen N.; Ruparel, Nikita B.; Diogenes, Anibal; Weintraub, Susan T.; Uhlson, Charis; Murphy, Robert C.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 120, No. 5, 03.05.2010, p. 1617-1626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patwardhan, AM, Akopian, AN, Ruparel, NB, Diogenes, A, Weintraub, ST, Uhlson, C, Murphy, RC & Hargreaves, KM 2010, 'Heat generates oxidized linoleic acid metabolites that activate TRPV1 and produce pain in rodents', Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 120, no. 5, pp. 1617-1626. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI41678
Patwardhan, Amol M ; Akopian, Armen N. ; Ruparel, Nikita B. ; Diogenes, Anibal ; Weintraub, Susan T. ; Uhlson, Charis ; Murphy, Robert C. ; Hargreaves, Kenneth M. / Heat generates oxidized linoleic acid metabolites that activate TRPV1 and produce pain in rodents. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2010 ; Vol. 120, No. 5. pp. 1617-1626.
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