Hemodynamic parameters following pelvic exenteration

J. W. Orr, H. M. Shingleton, S. J. Soong, Kenneth D Hatch, J. W. Bryant, E. E. Partridge, J. M. Austin, P. T. Taylor, S. C. Pearce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Hemodynamic parameters were prospectively studied in 31 patients who underwent pelvic exenteration. With the use of a thermistor-tipped pulmonary artery catheter, hemodynamic parameters were calculated during the intraoperative and acute (<48 hours) postoperative interval. The mean operative time was 5.5 ± 0.8 hours, and volume replacement (mean, 21.6 ml/kg/hr) consisted of crystalloid, colloid, and blood. Postoperative urine production (mean, 1.9 ml/kg/hr) was maintained with crystalloid (mean, 2.5 ml/kg/hr), colloid (0.2 ml/kg/hr), and blood (0.4 ml/kg/hr). Despite individual variations, the important parameters of cardiovascular function were maintained in the physiologic range. No patient developed cardiovascular or respiratory failure. We believe that the lack of perioperative morbidity and mortality was related, in substantial part, to this type of cardiovascular monitoring, which allows for the prompt diagnosis of potential problems and enables the physician to make appropriate interventions to correct these problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)882-892
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume146
Issue number8
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pelvic Exenteration
Colloids
Hemodynamics
Operative Time
Respiratory Insufficiency
Pulmonary Artery
Catheters
Urine
Morbidity
Physicians
Mortality
crystalloid solutions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Orr, J. W., Shingleton, H. M., Soong, S. J., Hatch, K. D., Bryant, J. W., Partridge, E. E., ... Pearce, S. C. (1983). Hemodynamic parameters following pelvic exenteration. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 146(8), 882-892.

Hemodynamic parameters following pelvic exenteration. / Orr, J. W.; Shingleton, H. M.; Soong, S. J.; Hatch, Kenneth D; Bryant, J. W.; Partridge, E. E.; Austin, J. M.; Taylor, P. T.; Pearce, S. C.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 146, No. 8, 1983, p. 882-892.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Orr, JW, Shingleton, HM, Soong, SJ, Hatch, KD, Bryant, JW, Partridge, EE, Austin, JM, Taylor, PT & Pearce, SC 1983, 'Hemodynamic parameters following pelvic exenteration', American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 146, no. 8, pp. 882-892.
Orr JW, Shingleton HM, Soong SJ, Hatch KD, Bryant JW, Partridge EE et al. Hemodynamic parameters following pelvic exenteration. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1983;146(8):882-892.
Orr, J. W. ; Shingleton, H. M. ; Soong, S. J. ; Hatch, Kenneth D ; Bryant, J. W. ; Partridge, E. E. ; Austin, J. M. ; Taylor, P. T. ; Pearce, S. C. / Hemodynamic parameters following pelvic exenteration. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1983 ; Vol. 146, No. 8. pp. 882-892.
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AU - Taylor, P. T.

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