Hepatic cysteamine and non-protein sulfhydryl levels following cystamine or cysteamine treatment of galactosamine-poisoned rats

J. R. Macdonald, A. J. Gandolfi, I. G. Sipes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hepatic cysteamine and non-protein sulfhydryl (NPSH) levels were determined in galactosamine (GAL)-poisoned rats following hepatoprotective cystamine or cysteamine treatments to determine whether alterations of hepatic NPSH status could contribute to their observed protective actions. D(+Galactosamine HC1 (400 mg/kg, ip) was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats at 8 pm. Cystamine diHCl (300 mg/kg, po) or cysteamine HC1 (170 mg/kg, ip) were administered 12 hr after GAL. Hepatic NPSH levels were determined using Ellman's reagent. Hepatic cysteamine levels were determined by separating NPSH Ellman's derivatives by reversed phase HPLC. Cystamine and cysteamine caused transient elevation of NPSH levels of 1-2 nanomoles/mg liver which correlated with the presence of 1-2 nanomoles of cysteamine/mg liver. However, neither cystamine nor cysteamine prevented NPSH levels from falling to 3 nanomoles/mg tissue 24 hr after GAL. Hepatoprotective treatments did not affect long term NPSH status in GAL-poisoned rats. However, transient NPSH increases, due to the intrahepatic presence of cysteamine, may contribute to the therapeutic effects of these hepatoprotective agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)483-494
Number of pages12
JournalDrug and Chemical Toxicology
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Chemical Health and Safety

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Hepatic cysteamine and non-protein sulfhydryl levels following cystamine or cysteamine treatment of galactosamine-poisoned rats'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this