Hepatitis C virus: Implications to pediatric practice

Hassan H Hassan, W. F. Balistreri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research has narrowed the gap in our understanding of viral hepatitis; we no longer must use the cumbersome label of 'non-A, non-B' hepatitis to indicate a major proportion of the cases. Although tremendous strides have been made in our understanding and recognition of hepatitis C virus infection it is clear that the present state of knowledge is relatively rudimentary because of the lack of appropriate investigative methodologies. The situation is analogous to the early course of events in our understanding of the hepatitis B virus. We therefore can expect continued, dynamic iteration of the current concepts regarding HCV infection. In view of the apparent long term consequences of HCV, the ultimate goal will be to develop an effective vaccine against the virus in order to diminish the potential for acquisition. There are, however, several factors which will serve to impede the development of an effective HCV vaccine: (1) viral genetic diversity and the continuous emergence of mutants; (2) inability to propagate the virus in tissue culture; (3) nonavailability of a reliable animal model or in vitro assay for HCV infection; and (4) inability to identify a protective (neutralizing) humoral immune response, as dramatically illustrated by the reinfection data of Farci et al. Thus despite the major achievement of identification of the HCV and the development of specific assays to detect its presence, the story remains incomplete.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)853-867
Number of pages15
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume12
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hepacivirus
Hepatitis
Viral Vaccines
Pediatrics
Viruses
Virus Diseases
Humoral Immunity
Infection
Hepatitis B virus
Vaccines
Animal Models
Research
In Vitro Techniques

Keywords

  • chronic active hepatitis
  • Hepatitis C virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Hepatitis C virus : Implications to pediatric practice. / Hassan, Hassan H; Balistreri, W. F.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, Vol. 12, No. 10, 1993, p. 853-867.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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